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China

China’s Growing Companies Need Maturity, Not Just Money

Chinese business leaders should learn lessons from Japanese firms' spending sprees of the 1980s and 1990s.

Sinopec is China's largest company
Sinopec is China's largest company

BEIJING — There's a reason analysts talk so much these days about "Chinese capital," which continues to make its presence felt as top companies in China begin to buy their way into new markets.

In 2015, according to government figures released last week, Chinese companies carried out 579 overseas mergers and acquisitions (M&A) in 62 countries and regions for a transaction total of $54.4 billion. China's foreign investment, in the meantime, hit a record high of $145.7 billion, accounting for 9.9% of global traffic and ranking second in the world.

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Ideas

The Trauma Of War, A Poisoned Guide For Parenting

As a psychoanalyst, Wolfgang Schmidbauer has researched the psychological effects of war on children — and in the process, also examined his own post-War childhood in Germany. In this article, he warns that parents tend to use their experiences of suffering as a method of education, with serious consequences.

Parents traumatized by war make their own experiences of suffering a core principle of education.

Wolfgang Schmidbauer*

As a young married civilian, British poet Robert Graves describes his mental state after World War I. "Shells used to come bursting on my bed at midnight, even though Nancy shared it with me," he wrote in Goodbye to All That, his wartime biography. "Strangers in daytime would assume the faces of friends who had been killed."

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