When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!
Migrant Influx Pushing Germany To Learn Arabic

HAMBURG — Few will deny that the influx of migrants in recent months, mostly coming from Syria and other Arab countries, has shaken up German society. Reactions have ranged from pride in Germany's ability to welcome refugees to outrage at the New Year's Eve attacks against women by mobs of mostly North African men.

But now, some are looking at practical, long-term ways of adjusting to the new reality. Writing in the German weekly newspaper Die Zeit, oneuniversity president said it should be compulsory for German students to learn Arabic.

Thomas Strothotte, President of the Kühne Logistics University in Hamburg, writes that the introduction of Arabic in German classrooms could make Germany a leader in gaining access to comprehension of the Arabic world. If Arabic were a required subject for all students, Strothotte writes: "This would prove that we acknowledge being an immigration country with a multilingual society."

An even superior act would be put the two languages on the same level, as languages of instruction, says Strothotte. This would make it possible for children to start preparing for the profound transformation process that has already started in the Middle East.

By pushing to learn Arabic language from a very young age on, Germany would present itself in the Middle East as a valuable economic, cultural and political partner, ready to accompany those countries in their transformation process.

In the meantime, broadcasting companies under public law are planning on adding Arabic programs. Considering the strong influx of refugees coming from the Middle East, the country's ARD network announced the support of the Deutsche Welle TV channel DW Arabia.

Further, broadcasting of documentaries and news coverage for an Arabic audience is scheduled. ARD chairman Karola Wille calls the cooperation "an important signal, in difficult times." Since December 2015, DW Arabia has been reporting 24/7 on recent events and evolutions, from a German and European point of view.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Ideas

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Elon Musk bought Twitter in the name of absolute freedom. But numerous research shows that social media hate speech leads to actual violence. Musk and others running social networks need to strike a balance.

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Freedom on social networks can result in insults and defamation

Jean-Marc Vittori

-Analysis-

PARIS — Elon Musk is the world's leading reckless driver. The ever unpredictable CEO of Tesla and SpaceX is now behind a very different wheel as the new head of Twitter.

He began by banning remote work before slightly backtracking and authorizing it for the company’s “significant contributors.” Now he’s opened the door to Donald Trump to return to Twitter, while at the same time vaunting a decrease in the number of hate-messages that appear on the social network…all while firing Twitter’s content moderation teams.

But this time, the world’s richest man will have to make choices. He’ll have to limit his otherwise unconditional love of free speech. “Freedom consists of being able to do everything that does not harm others,” proclaimed the French-born Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1789.

Yet freedom on social networks results not only in insults and defamation, but sometimes also in physical aggression.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest