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Germany

With Merkel Isolated, Europe Must Share Burden And Blame

The German Chancellor has made many mistakes: She has isolated Germany, inside Europe. But it is hardly her fault alone in a continent unable to see the stakes at hand.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin on March 16
German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin on March 16
Sascha Lehnartz

BERLIN — German Chancellor Angela Merkel has earned a reputation for approaching politics with the mind of the physics student she originally was. She has a way of considering problems in reverse, and generally makes sure everyone in the classroom has put on protective glasses before activating the Bunsen burner. Always minimize the risk of injury.

What's interesting about this analogy is that it has endured, even if she has shown over time to occasionally have some truly ill-considered ideas. But it has only been within the context of the migrant crisis that doubts about the Chancellor's otherwise infallible logic have finally emerged.

In this case, Merkel has now begun to face the problem from the beginning, localizing the potential solution by seeing where the refugees are coming from — meaning: Syria, but also through Turkey.

She missed just one minor detail: 27 other Europeans, plus at least one Bavarian, don't have her patience to wait for the outcome of this bold experiment.

Power of persistence

She has also overestimated the readiness of Germany's neighbors to bow to the categorical imperative of acceptance that has been articulated in Berlin.

The result of this misjudgment is that Merkel finds herself alarmingly isolated in Europe, whose political destiny now also depends on the whims of a part-time autocrat in Ankara.

Nevertheless, the Chancellor is right when she points out in her latest government announcement that it would be shameful for Europe, if 28 member states with 500 million inhabitants are not capable of finding a common solution to a crisis that concerns all of them.

Perhaps the German leader's persistence is not ultimately constructive. But as for the will missing from other so-called "major" European powers to share the burden — that cannot be blamed on Angela Merkel's physics after all.

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Migrant Lives

What's Driving More Venezuelans To Migrate To The U.S.

With dimmed hopes of a transition from the economic crisis and repressive regime of Nicolas Maduro, many Venezuelans increasingly see the United States, rather than Latin America, as the place to rebuild a life..

Photo of a family of Migrants from Venezuela crossing the Rio Grande between Mexico and the U.S. to surrender to the border patrol with the intention of requesting humanitarian asylum​

Migrants from Venezuela crossed the Rio Grande between Mexico and the U.S. to surrender to the border patrol with the intention of requesting humanitarian asylum.

Julio Borges

-Analysis-

Migration has too many elements to count. Beyond the matter of leaving your homeland, the process creates a gaping emptiness inside the migrant — and outside, in their lives. If forced upon someone, it can cause psychological and anthropological harm, as it involves the destruction of roots. That's in fact the case of millions of Venezuelans who have left their country without plans for the future or pleasurable intentions.

Their experience is comparable to paddling desperately in shark-infested waters. As many Mexicans will concur, it is one thing to take a plane, and another to pay a coyote to smuggle you to some place 'safe.'

Venezuela's mass emigration of recent years has evolved in time. Initially, it was the middle and upper classes and especially their youth, migrating to escape the socialist regime's socio-political and economic policies. Evidently, they sought countries with better work, study and business opportunities like the United States, Panama or Spain. The process intensified after 2017 when the regime's erosion of democratic structures and unrelenting economic vandalism were harming all Venezuelans.

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