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Germany

Tracking How Air Pollution Kills Differently, City By City

More than 3 million people die prematurely each year from dirty air. But researchers can now trace what exactly causes the bad air in different locations. A way to begin to fix it.

Collecting air pollution data in Thailand
Collecting air pollution data in Thailand
Christopher Schrader

MUNICH — The air in Beijing, Moscow and Cairo is full of emissions and noxious matter that people can see, smell and sometimes even taste. And they are in fact deadly, leading every year to premature deaths, according to new research by the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany.

The numbers of deaths due to lung and heart diseases, cancer and strokes are alarming: Per 100,000 citizens, there are 126 premature deaths in Beijing, 58 in Moscow and 48 in Cairo.

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Society

Urban Indigenous: How Peru's Shipibo-Conibo Keep Amazon Culture Alive In The City

For four years, indigenous photographer David Díaz Gonzales has documented the lives and movements of his Shipibo-Conibo community, as many of them migrated from their native Peruvian Amazon to the city. A work of remembrance and resistance.

For Shipibo-Conibo women, sporting a fringe is usually a sign of celebration or ceremony.

Rosa Chávez Yacila

YARINACOCHA — It was decades ago when the Shipibo-Conibo left their settlements along the banks of the Ucayali River, in eastern Peru, to begin a great migration to the cities. Still among the largest Amazonian communities in Peru — 32,964 according to the Ministry of Culture — though most Shipibo-Conibo now live in the urban district of Yarinacocha.

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