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Egypt

Toll Climbs In Second Deadly Train Crash In Egypt Since November

EL WATAN NEWS, REUTERS ARABIC, AL AHRAM (Egypt)

Worldcrunch

CAIRO – The death toll has risen to 20 in a train crash near Egypt's capital, the second deadly rail accident in two months.

The crash in the city of Giza late Monday has also left more than 170 injured, Reuters reports. On November 17 in the southern city of Assiout, a train hit a school bus, killing more than 40 children.

The latest accident involved two trains crashing into each other. Most of the victims are believed to be members of the Egyptian military. An army spokesman reported to Al Ahram that earlier reports of a military train were incorrect, and that the soldiers were traveling on a regular railline.

Amidst a politically tension atmosphere in Egypt, calls immediately came for the resignation of Transportation Minister Hatem Abdellatif, who had taken over for Mohamed Rachad Al Matiny who'd been forced out of office after November's accident. Coincidentally, on Tuesday, Al Matiny was in court, where he denied responsibility for the Assiout accident, El Watan reported.

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Society

"In Pain You Shall Bring Forth Children" — The Business Behind Suffering In Childbirth

Certain female doctors, extremist midwives, online consultants extol the benefits of painful labor, blame mothers who resort to C-sections and convince them to refuse anesthesia. From Italy, an expose on who they are and why they preach a return to the ancestral nature of motherhood.

Photo of a home birth

Home birth

Francesca Bubba

ROME — “I was told that enduring the pain of childbirth would be the first test as a mother..."

Ginevra Massiletti, 32, went into labor with her first child last year in the southern Italian city of Cosenza, convinced that childbirth should be a fully natural experience.

"I was in too much pain, but I didn't want to give in to analgesia," she said. "In the end, however, I couldn't take it; I asked for an epidural to feel less pain, but in the meantime I was crying and apologizing to my baby, feeling that I had betrayed him because of my weakness and need for relief.”

Ginevra says she's now over the shock, but “for months, I believed I was not up to my motherhood.”

During her pregnancy, reading various blogs and social pages, she had internalized a belief: that childbirth accompanied by anesthesia to relieve the mother's pain was a second-class birth, and especially that in doing so she would selfishly put herself before the baby.

Ginevra’s is not an isolated case. Indeed, online, in some newspapers, and even in certain health circles, a narrative of motherhood that ostracizes any medical-pharmacological support for childbirth, not to mention the use of C-section, is raging in the name of an ancestral vision according to which the mother's body must do everything on its own. Any “little help” offered by science will have negative effects on the unborn child.

Behind this, there is often also a real business, with courses and consultations, strictly on a for-profit basis.

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