When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Three Kurdish Women Activists Shot Dead In Paris

LE PARISIEN, EUROPE 1, FRANCE INFO (France)

Worldcrunch

PARIS - Three Kurdish women activists, including a founding member of the militant group PKK, have been found dead inside a Kurdish cultural center in Paris, each with gunshot wounds.

The bodies of the women were found early on Thursday inside the information center of the Kurdish Institute of Paris in the French capital's central 10th arrondissement, according to France’s radio station Europe 1.

One of the victims is Sakine Cansiz, a founding member of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, commonly known as PKK, which has long fought for greater Kurdish autonomy and is considered a terrorist organization by the Turkish government.

The other women have been identified as Fidan DoÄŸan, a representative of the Kurdish National Congress in Paris who worked in the information center, and Leyla Söylemez, a young activist, France’s daily Le Parisien reveals.

Firat, a news agency close to the PKK, said two of those killed were shot in the head and one in the stomach, and that the murder weapon was believed to have been fitted with a silencer.

French Interior Minister Manuel Valls called the killings "intolerable" during an interview on France Info news radio, adding that an investigation was underway. Later in the morning, members of the Kurdish community started demonstrating outside the information center as Valls arrived to visit the scene of the shootings.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Economy

Why More Countries Are Banning Foreigners From Buying Real Estate

Canada has become the most recent country to impose restrictions on non-residents buying real estate, arguing that wealthy investors from other countries are pricing out would-be local homeowners. But is singling out foreigners the best way to face a troubled housing market?

Photo of someone walking by houses in Toronto

A person walks by a row of houses in Toronto

Shaun Lavelle, Riley Sparks, Ginevra Falciani

PARIS — It’s easy to forget that soon after the outbreak of COVID-19, many real estate experts were forecasting that housing prices could face a once-in-generation drop. The logic was that a shrinking pandemic economy would combine with people moving out of cities to push costs down in a lasting way.

Ultimately, in most places, the opposite has happened. Home prices in the U.S., Canada, Britain, Germany, Australia and New Zealand rose between 25% and 50% since the outbreak of COVID-19.

This explosion was driven by a number of factors, including low interest rates, supply chain issues in construction and shortages in available properties caused in part by investors buying up large swathes of housing stock.

Yet some see another culprit deserving of particular attention: foreign buyers.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest