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CNN (US), THE WASHINGTON POST (US), REUTERS

Worldcrunch

MOORE – The search for survivors was coming to an end Wednesday after a deadly tornado tore through the city of Moore, in the suburbs of Oklahoma City. The tornado killed at least 24 people and injured about 240, Reuters reports, a revised toll after initial reports cited more deaths.

The work of emergency crews to find survivors among the rubble is almost over, officials said. Oklahoma County commissioner Brian Maughan told Reuters it seemed no one was missing: "As far as I know, of the list of people that we have had that they are all accounted for in one way or another."

Still, some residents have not been able to make contact with their relatives, CNN reports.

At least 24 people were killed, according to the state medical examiner's office."I think that will stand," said Glenn Lewis, the mayor of Moore. Among the victims were 9 children, including seven who died at Plaza Towers Elementary School.

Initial reports of at least 91 and later 51 deaths were erroneous, said Amy Elliot, chief administrative officer for the Oklahoma Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. She told CNN that some of the dead people had been counted twice in aftermath of the tornado.

With winds reaching over 20 0mph, the tornado was classified EF-5, the strongest category measured said the National Weather Service. According to CNN, about 2,400 homes have been damaged in Moore and Oklahoma city, and 10,000 people were directly impacted by the tornado.

The area is now coping with the infrastructure and communication problems common after natural disasters: power failures, gas leaks, lack of water, poor cellphone service, the Washington Post reports.

Before and after picture of #Oklahoma Tornado Destruction. #WordsCannotExpresstwitter.com/PatriotLemonad…

— Patriot Lemonade (@PatriotLemonade) 22 mai 2013

Photo: flummery: dangordon: A picture a friend of mine sent me leaving Moore. He is okay. #okwx#oklahoma... tmblr.co/ZwVpbylZRsB1

— Drucilla B. Blood (@drublood) 22 mai 2013

PICTURE: The #tornado over #Moore#Oklahoma, captured by Nasa satellite bbc.in/13Il7cbtwitter.com/BBCWorld/statu…

— BBC News (World) (@BBCWorld) 21 mai 2013

Real picture from a volunteer that went to help after the #Moore#Oklahoma#Tornado today. Absolutely #Chillingtwitter.com/Anony_Mystique…

— AnonyMystique (@Anony_Mystique) 22 mai 2013

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