BBC (UK), CNN (USA)

Worldcrunch

WASHINGTON- In a statement released on the White House's website, US President Barack Obama has called for calm as protests continue following a Florida jury's not guilty verdict in the Trayvon Martin-George Zimmerman case, reports the BBC.

In his statement, Obama called Martin's death a tragedy, but said that America was “a nation of laws and a jury has spoken.”

Zimmerman was accused of murdering Martin in February 2012 during a nighttime neighborhood patrol, with prosecutors arguing that Zimmerman had racially profiled the African-American victim before shooting him. Zimmerman, who considers himself Latino, was officially cleared of all charges after a widely covered Florida trial.

After the acquittal Saturday, protests spread across the country. Even though most of the protests were peaceful, some parts of Los Angeles grew tense when protesters threw objects toward police forces. LAPD spokesman said at least nine people were arrested during the night from Sunday to Monday, reports CNN.

Thousands of people have demonstrated in the streets of major US cities, including San Fransisco, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore, Detroit and New York.

In New York, demonstrators marched through Manhattan, chanting slogans such as: “This is what democracy looks like” and “No Justice, No Peace!”

Here is the CNN's report on the protests:

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Society

Why Mexican Journalists Keep Getting Killed — And It’s Not Just Narcos

Three journalists were killed in the first three weeks of 2022, sparking nationwide protests. But not only narcotraffickers are to blame: The state, corrupt private companies, and even media companies themselves hold responsibility for leaving journalists vulnerable on the frontline.

A vigil Wednesday in Tijuana after the murder of journalist Lourdes Maldonado and photojournalist Margarito Esquivel,

Raquel Natalicchio/ZUMA
Laura Valentina Cortés Sierra

The photograph of a cinnamon-colored pitbull waiting in front of a house cordoned off by the police has spread around Latin America. The dog, named “Chato,” was the companion of Lourdes Maldonado, the Mexican journalist shot dead Sunday in front of her house in Tijuana.

Maldonado’s murder came just days after the killing of photojournalist Margarito Martínez, spurring demonstrations this week across 62 cities in Mexico, as the brazen targeting of journalists in the country is in back the spotlight several years after narcotraffickers stepped up their campaign to eliminate those reporting on their activities.

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