Watching Notre Dame burn on April 15
Watching Notre Dame burn on April 15
Olivia Han

PARIS — Firefighters said early Tuesday that they'd extinguished the final flames of the massive Notre Dame cathedral fire that began shortly before 7 p.m. local time Monday. Authorities say the cause of the fire may be "potentially linked" to ongoing renovations. The images of a blaze engulfing one of history's most iconic sights, which draws some 13 million visitors a year, captivated much of the world. Newspapers in France and around the world Tuesday dedicated their front pages to the drama in the heart of Paris.

FRANCE

Libération

Le Figaro

La Croix

Le Télégramme

Sud Ouest


BELGIUM

Gazet van Antwerpen


GERMANY

Der Tagesspiegel


SWITZERLAND

La Tribune de Genève


ITALY

La Repubblica


GREECE

Kathimerini


PORTUGAL

Público


SPAIN

El Mundo


RUSSIA

Izvestia


UK

The Daily Telegraph


USA

Chicago Tribune


CANADA

Le Journal de Montréal


ARGENTINA

Clarín


BRAZIL

O Estado de São Paulo


URUGUAY

El Mundo


CHILE

El Mercurio de Antofagasta


ECUADOR

El Universo


PERU

El Comerico


EL SALVADOR

El Diario de Hoy


INDIA

Hindustan Times


SOUTH AFRICA

Network 24 Beeld

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Green

Inside Sweden's "100,000-Year" Solution To Bury Nuclear Waste

As experts debate whether nuclear power can become another leading renewable energy source, Sweden has adopted a first-of-its-kind underground depository for nuclear waste — and many countries are following their lead.

At Sweden's Oskarshamn nuclear power plant

Carl-Johan Karlsson

As last fall’s climate summit in Glasgow made it clear that the world is still on route for major planetary disaster, it also brought the question of nuclear power squarely back on the agenda. A growing number of experts and policymakers now argue that nuclear energy deserves many of the same considerations as wind, solar and other leading renewables.

But while staunch opponents to nuclear may be slowly shifting their opinion, and countries like France, the UK and especially China plan to expand their nuclear portfolios, one main question keeps haunting policymakers: how do we store the radioactive waste?

In Sweden, the government claims to have found a solution.

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