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BBC ARABIC (UK), AL-MASRY AL-YOUM (Egypt)

CAIRO - Protests are continuing in Egypt following the verdict in the trial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, his former Interior Minister Habib al-Adly, Mubarak's two sons and six security officials.

Though the former president and interior minister receieved 25-year sentences, Alaa and Gamal Mubarak and the six senior officials were acquitted -- and as candidates Mohamed Mursi and Ahmed Shafik prepare for the upcoming runoff for the presidency, Cairo's Tahrir Square and other sites around the country are filling with protesters condemning the ruling and demanding a second revolution, BBC Arabic reported.

The events come amidst what BBC Arabic called "frantic efforts" to reach a political agreement among revolutionary factions hoping to defeat Shafik, Mubarak's last appointed minister before his resignation in February 2011.

Shafik held a press conference on Sunday attacking the Muslim Brotherhood and Mursi, saying he represented a "civil non-religious state while Mursi represents a sectarian state."

Inexplicably, Shafik said the Muslim Brotherhood "are from the previous regime," while failing to mention his own role as a longtime Mubarak loyalist. He also denounced what he called the Brotherhood's intimidation campaign "in order to influence the decision of the voter," which he said gave them an unfair advantage in the first round.

Also on Monday, the jailed former president was visited at Tora prison by his wife, Suzanne Mubarak. Al Masry Al Youm reported that law typically forbids prisoners from receiving visitors in the first month of their sentence, but an exception was made for the former first couple.

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The potential sabotage has raised the question of the vulnerabilities of European pipelines

Christian Bueger

Whatever caused the damage to the Nord Stream gas pipelines in the Baltic Sea, it appears to be the first major attack on critical “subsea” (underwater) infrastructure in Europe. It’s now widely thoughtnot least by Nato – that the explosions that led to major leaks in the two pipelines were not caused by accidents.

The alliance says they were a deliberate act of sabotage.

The attacks occurred in the exclusive economic zones of Denmark and Sweden and demonstrate the risks that Europe’s subsea infrastructures are facing. This raises the question of the vulnerabilities of European pipelines, electricity and internet cables, and other maritime infrastructure. Europe will have to revisit its policies for protecting them.

But it is still unclear how the attacks were carried out. The investigations will probably take months to complete. Still, there are two likely scenarios.

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