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BBC ARABIC (UK), AL-MASRY AL-YOUM (Egypt)

CAIRO - Protests are continuing in Egypt following the verdict in the trial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, his former Interior Minister Habib al-Adly, Mubarak's two sons and six security officials.

Though the former president and interior minister receieved 25-year sentences, Alaa and Gamal Mubarak and the six senior officials were acquitted -- and as candidates Mohamed Mursi and Ahmed Shafik prepare for the upcoming runoff for the presidency, Cairo's Tahrir Square and other sites around the country are filling with protesters condemning the ruling and demanding a second revolution, BBC Arabic reported.

The events come amidst what BBC Arabic called "frantic efforts" to reach a political agreement among revolutionary factions hoping to defeat Shafik, Mubarak's last appointed minister before his resignation in February 2011.

Shafik held a press conference on Sunday attacking the Muslim Brotherhood and Mursi, saying he represented a "civil non-religious state while Mursi represents a sectarian state."

Inexplicably, Shafik said the Muslim Brotherhood "are from the previous regime," while failing to mention his own role as a longtime Mubarak loyalist. He also denounced what he called the Brotherhood's intimidation campaign "in order to influence the decision of the voter," which he said gave them an unfair advantage in the first round.

Also on Monday, the jailed former president was visited at Tora prison by his wife, Suzanne Mubarak. Al Masry Al Youm reported that law typically forbids prisoners from receiving visitors in the first month of their sentence, but an exception was made for the former first couple.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Along The "New Border" Of Ukraine, Annexation Has Just Doubled The Danger

Vladimir Putin announced the annexation of Ukrainian territories in a ceremony in the Kremlin. In a village just a few kilometers away from what is now the Ukraine-Russia "border" in Putin's eyes, life continues amid constant shelling and the fear of what comes next.

Ukrainian soldiers are stationed in the village of Inhulka, near Kherson.

Stefan Schocher

INHULKA — The trail leads over a gravel road, a rickety pontoon bridge past a checkpoint. Here in the remote village of Inhulka near Kherson in southern Ukraine, soldiers sit in front of the village shop. Inside, two women run back and forth behind the counter, making coffee, selling sausages, weighing tomatoes. "Natalochka, where are the cookies," calls a dark-haired lady across the room.

But Natalochka, her colleague, is about to lose her nerve. "What kind of life is that?" she says, finally reaching up to grab the cookies from the top of a shelf. What kind of life can it be, she asks, when something is constantly exploding next to you and you don't know if you'll wake up in the morning.

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Inhulka is the center of a rural community. 1,587 inhabitants, as the village chief says, one school, one kindergarten, one doctor, two stores. Since March, nothing here is as it used to be. That was when the Russian army came to the village.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

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