MENA (Egypt), NEW YORK TIMES (USA), RT, AP

Worldcrunch

CAIRO – Ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi is being detained over alleged ties with the Palestinian militant group Hamas, and questioned on related charges of murder and kidnapping.

A top Cairo court has ordered that Morsi be questioned on whether he collaborated with Hamas for his escape – along with other top Muslim Brotherhood leaders – from a prison in early 2011 during the 18-day revolt that toppled Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian publicly-funded news agency MENA reports.

It is one of the first official reports of the fate of the former Egyptian President who was ousted on July 3. State accusations against Morsi include killing prisoners and officers as well as kidnapping soldiers.

Morsi had been kept in an undisclosed location since being deposed. His detention can be extended as the inquiry continues, according to AP. The news comes as supporters and opponents of Morsi prepare for potentially tense national protests on Friday.

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Anti-Morsi protest in Cairo on July 7 - Photo: S. Behn

Meanwhile, RT reports that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has decided to abandon its plan to restart negotiations about a $4.8 billion loan to Egypt – on the grounds that the country needs to first regain political stability.

However, aid from the United States will continue to reach Egypt: By deciding not to offer a declaration on whether the July 3 overthrow was indeed a coup d"état, the Obama administration has allowed for the funneling of $1.5 billion in annual American aid to Egypt to continue, according to the New York Times.

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Geopolitics

In Sudan, A Surprise About-Face Marks Death Of The Revolution

Ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok was the face of the "stolen revolution". The fact that he accepted, out of the blue, to return at the same position, albeit on different footing, opens the door to the final legitimization of the coup.

Sudanese protesters demonstrating against the military regime in London on Nov. 20, 2021

Nesrine Malik

A little over a month ago, a military coup in Sudan ended a military-civilian partnership established after the 2019 revolution that removed President Omar al-Bashir after almost 30 years in power. The army arrested the Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and, along with several of his cabinet and other civil government officials, threw him in detention. In the weeks that followed, the Sudanese military and their partners in power, the Rapid Support Forces, moved quickly.

They reappointed a new government of “technocrats” (read “loyalists”), shut down internet services, and violently suppressed peaceful protests against the coup and its sabotaging of the 2019 revolution. During those weeks, Hamdok remained the symbol of the stolen revolution, betrayed by the military, detained illegally, unable to communicate with the people who demanded his return. In his figure, the moral authority of the counter-coup resided.

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