When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!

CHINA NATIONAL RADIO, XINHUA, CCTV (China), CENTRAL TIBETAN ADMINISTRATION

Worldcrunch

LHASA – Rescuers have recovered 21 bodies three days after a massive landslide in China’s Tibet Autonomous Region that buried more than 80 mine workers, China National Radio reported on Monday.

The landslide occurred three days ago in Maizhokunggar County, about 68 kilometers from the Tibetan capital of Lhasa, reports Xinhua. The disaster stuck a workers’ camp of the Gyama mine, at about 6 a.m. on Friday. “Large swathes of rocks suddenly fell down from the mountaintop and the huge sound shook the whole valley. It was a terrible scene,” said a local villager.

Rescuers have been hampered by the huge amount of debris, the 4,600-meter altitude and snowy weather, said Xinhua. More than 3,500 rescuers, along with 10 sniffer dogs and 20 life detectors have been deployed at the site to find potential survivors of the 83 unaccounted miners.

The workers were mostly migrants from the southwestern Chinese provinces of Yunna, Guizhou and Shichuan. Pang Chunlei, a Tibetan rescue commander told Chinese state television broadcaster CCTV he wasn’t optimistic survivors would be found.

“The workers live in tents and have been buried by the landslide. We are digging but the collapsed area is just too huge. It covers the entire mountain gully,” Pang said.

In a statement, the Tibetan government in exile, based in Dharamsala, northern India, said “the tragic incident could be the result of aggressive expansion and large-scale exploitation of mineral in the Gyama Valley, a man-made phenomenon rather than a natural disaster.”

The Gyama mine is a large scale polymetallic deposit consisting of copper, molybdenum, gold, silver, lead and zinc with the potential to become the China’s biggest copper producer in the next 10 years. In the past decade, the mine has been a “major failure in terms of the social harmony and environmental protection in the area,” said the Tibetan government in exile’s statement.

[rebelmouse-image 27086548 alt="""" original_size="640x446" expand=1]

Tibet. Map Keithonearth

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Coronavirus

Masks And Me: Take This Pandemic Story At Face Value

Even if COVID cases are rising again, the author isn't ready to mask up again. But she's also not quite ready to say goodbye forever...

Photo of someone holding a surgical mask

Hold on to your mask. For COVID, or maybe the flu? And then there are the memories...

Emma Albright

-Essay-

PARIS — Waiting in line at the pharmacy the other day, I heard a customer ask for a COVID-19 test. The pharmacist let out a long sarcastic sigh: “We’re still doing those?”

Of course they are, as cases are again rising ahead of winter here in France and many other places around the world. But the true sign of the depth of our collective COVID fatigue were the masks at the pharmacy. That is, there were none, not even the pharmacist was wearing one, even if a sign hangs in front saying they’re required.

The regular announcements that have begun airing again on French radio about the importance of masks in containing the virus sound beside the point. Indeed, wearing masks is no longer a requirement anywhere in France, merely a suggestion.

Still, masks have by no means gone away, either in society, or my mind. That becomes clearest when I’m riding the metro in Paris. As I count the ratio of masked to non-masked, and hear the daily announcements on the benefits of wearing one, a dilemma starts to creep in…

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest