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BUENOS AIRES HERALD, CLARIN (Argentina), THE GUARDIAN (UK)

Worldcrunch

BUENOS AIRES – Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner has sent a letter to British Prime Minister David Cameron urging him to hand over the Falkland Islands.

In the letter, writes Clarin, Kirchner asks Cameron to comply with a 1960 UN resolution that “proclaimed the necessity of ‘bringing to an end colonialism in all its forms and manifestations,’” to pass sovereignty to Argentina of the archipelago referred to there as the Malvinas Islands.

In 1982, after Argentina had invaded the islands, British forces sailed southward and a two-month-long War between the two countries resulted in the surrender of all Argentine forces and the return of the islands to British administration.

The letter, published as an advertisement in the British press Thursday, the 180th anniversary of the day the UK took over the disputed territory, states that “Argentina was forcibly stripped of the Malvinas Islands, which are situated 14,000 kilometers (8700 miles away from London,” writes the Buenos Aires Herald,

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UK to Falklands - Map Wikipedia

“The Question of the Malvinas Islands is also a cause embraced by Latin America and by a vast majority of peoples and governments around the world that reject colonialism,” writes Kirchner.

The Argentinian president also urges Cameron to abide by a 1965 UN resolution calling for Argentina and the UK to negotiate a solution to the sovereign dispute, reports the Buenos Aires Herald.

Kirchner’s letter follows the British government’s decision last December to name a large chunk of Antarctica after Queen Elizabeth, a move considered by Argentina as a provocation, according to the Guardian.

The letter published in the Guardian:

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