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In China, Going Home After 23 Years Of Wrongful Imprisonment

Chen Man's release from prison has historical significance, writes Liang Yingfei.

Inside a prison in Macau, China
Inside a prison in Macau, China
Liang Yingfei

MIANZHU — As Chen Man returns home from prison, freedom is no longer a mirage, it's more like a soft mist, invisible but real. At seven in the morning, he will go to the local market to do his food shopping. On the way home, he will buy a fresh bunch of gardenias. When it feels a bit chilly, he can stretch out in the sun. All these thoughts remind Man that, after 23 years behind bars, he is finally free.

In 1988, Man gave up a steady job working for the local government in his hometown Mianzhu, a small city in China's southwestern Sichuan province, to seek his fortune with some friends in booming Hainan, China's southernmost island.

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LGBTQ Plus

LGBTQ+ Seniors In Mexico: Between Aging, Identity And Isolation

Growing old in Mexico brings uncertainty, regardless of gender identity or sexual orientation. However, being LGBTQ+ brings additional challenges, which the pandemic accentuated.

People gather for a pride parade in Queretaro, Mexico

Georgina G. Alvarez

MEXICO CITY — Mario is 69 years old. He found a new sense of peace 13 years ago, materialized in a birth certificate that finally reflected a truth he had always known but struggled to put into words: "I am a trans man."

“I feel like a survivor of many things," he says. "Believe me that the new life challenges no longer harm me. I think that I have already gone through all the ugly things of life, all the ignorance, all the pain, the sadness, and everything else. For me what follows is to say: ‘of course I can!’.”

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When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

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