Geopolitics

Even If Far Right Lost, Fear And Hatred Now Rule In Austria

The far-right candidate may have lost the Austrian presidential election in the end, but the campaign has already changed the country for the worse.

Supporters of Freedom Party (FPÖ) candidate Norbert Hofer.
Supporters of Freedom Party (FPÖ) candidate Norbert Hofer.
Cathrin Kalhweit

- Analysis -

VIENNA — Austria has just endured a fierce, unpleasant election campaign. During the final weeks, everybody expected the vote to end with a clear victory for Freedom Party (FPÖ) candidate Norbert Hofer, who would have been Europe's first far-right head of state since the end of World War II.

But the election result ultimately turned out differently. Though there was still no clear winner by Sunday night, Alexander Van der Bellen finally was able to claim victory the next day.

Still, regardless of the election outcome, the country has changed dramatically over the last several months. Sensationalist media, the FPÖ and even some in the Christian democratic and conservative Austrian People's Party (ÖVP) have jumped on the bandwagon with hyperbolic platitudes splashed all over social networks: There is talk of an "increasing crime rate," a belief that "women can't walk the streets alone anymore," and even that "foreigners are all rapists and murderers."

Hatred and contempt are suddenly acceptable, because they're directed at others — outsiders. That's what Hofer suggested in his final speech, when he said foreigners who care about Austria may stay, "but those who follow ISIS, or rape women, must go."

Gross generalization and defamation have become widespread, with hateful comments parroted back by a public that passively absorbs them. The election campaign drifted far away from its stated goal of finding the right person to represent the country, attract investors, mediate and connect.

At the end of the day, Hofer could claim victory, even if he didn't become president. He demonstrated a clear path for how a right-wing leader can rise to power: to sweep the country "clean" with an iron besom, to set limits to the current establishment, to restore the old order. Those in Austria who still see shades of gray, and who favor a moderate approach, are lost right now.

With the ballots counted and Van der Bellen elected, the real fight for Austria has just begun.

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Geopolitics

In Sudan, A Surprise About-Face Marks Death Of The Revolution

Ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok was the face of the "stolen revolution". The fact that he accepted, out of the blue, to return at the same position, albeit on different footing, opens the door to the final legitimization of the coup.

Sudanese protesters demonstrating against the military regime in London on Nov. 20, 2021

Nesrine Malik

A little over a month ago, a military coup in Sudan ended a military-civilian partnership established after the 2019 revolution that removed President Omar al-Bashir after almost 30 years in power. The army arrested the Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and, along with several of his cabinet and other civil government officials, threw him in detention. In the weeks that followed, the Sudanese military and their partners in power, the Rapid Support Forces, moved quickly.

They reappointed a new government of “technocrats” (read “loyalists”), shut down internet services, and violently suppressed peaceful protests against the coup and its sabotaging of the 2019 revolution. During those weeks, Hamdok remained the symbol of the stolen revolution, betrayed by the military, detained illegally, unable to communicate with the people who demanded his return. In his figure, the moral authority of the counter-coup resided.

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