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PHILIPPINE STAR, PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER (The Philippines), BBC (UK)

Worldcrunch

Tens of thousands of people have been forced to evacuate the Philippine capital Manila due to severe floods.

Ten people were killed on Tuesday in a landslide caused by the torrential rain, reports the Philippine Star.

Eight members of a family, including a two-month old baby, were crushed by the landslide in Quezon City in the metropolitan area of Manila.

Torrential rain has battered the Philippines for over week, caused by Typhoon Saola. Reports suggest that the monsoon is being enhanced by tropical storm Haikui, currently situated 184 miles north-east of Taiwan, reports the BBC.

The Philippine government has closed all offices and schools because of the waist-deep floods. The Philippine Daily Inquirer also reported that the Stock Exchange had been flooded.

The death toll has steadily risen to 50 and flooding is predicted to continue as La Mesa Dam, the main reservoir for Manila's metropolitan area, starts to overflow.

Devastating floods in 2009 caused the dam to overflow, which resulted in 400 deaths.

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Ideas

How Turkey Can Bring Its Brain Drain Back Home

Turkey heads to the polls next year as it faces its worst economic crisis in decades. Disillusioned by corruption, many young people have already left. However, Turkey's disaffected young expats are still very attached to their country, and could offer the best hope for a new future for the country.

Photo of people on a passenger ferry on the Bosphorus, with Istanbul in the background

Leaving Istanbul?

Bekir Ağırdır*

-Analysis-

ISTANBUL — Turkey goes to the polls next June in crucial national elections. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is up against several serious challenges, as a dissatisfied electorate faces the worst economic crisis of his two-decade rule. The opposition is polling well, but the traditional media landscape is in the hands of the government and its supporters.

But against this backdrop, many, especially the young, are disillusioned with the country and its entire political system.

Young or old, people from every demographic, cultural group and class who worry about the future of Turkey are looking for something new. Relationships and dialogues between people from different political traditions and backgrounds are increasing. We all constantly feel the country's declining quality of life and worry about the prevalence of crime and lawlessness.

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