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Geopolitics

Deadly French Jewish School Shooting Has 'Striking Similarities' To Recent Killings

Southwest France has seen its third deadly shooting in the past week, as a killer rides up on a scooter at a Jewish school in Toulouse. Police are investigating possible links with recent killings of French soldiers in the region.

Police cordon off the area surrounding the Ozar Hatorah school (6MON2PANAME)
Police cordon off the area surrounding the Ozar Hatorah school (6MON2PANAME)

*NEWSBITES

TOULOUSE - A gunman opened fire in front of a Jewish school in the southwest French city of Toulouse, killing four people, including three children.

Witnesses saw the shooter opening fire from his scooter on a group of adults and children outside the Ozar Hatorah school at around 8.15am. The killer then left his black scooter to follow children into the school, before riding away.

The victims are a 30-year-old teacher and his sons, three and six years old, and the school headmaster's daughter, aged 10.

French President Nicolas Sarkozy called the shootings an "abominable drama" and a "frightening tragedy," while his main opponent for the 2012 presidential election François Hollande said he was going to go to Toulouse "immediately" out of "solidarity" for the Jewish community.

It's the third shooting in the region in the past week carried out from a motorbike.

On Thursday, a driveby gunman opened fire on three uniformed paratroopers at an ATM in Montauban around 50 kilometers from Toulouse, killing two and critically wounding the other, before speeding away. Four days earlier, a gunman on a motorbike shot and killed another paratrooper in Toulouse.

Sarkozy said there were "striking similarities' between Monday's shooting and last week's attacks.

According to police officials, the Ozar Hatorah school killer was armed with two guns, one of them matching the caliber of the shootings in Toulouse and Montauban last week.

Read more from Le Monde in French

Photo - 6MON2PANAME

*Newsbites are digest items, not direct translations

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Society

Now They're Diagnosing Burnout's Never-Quit Cousin: Burn-On

Feeling overworked but not yet burned out? Often the problem is “burn-on,” an under-researched phenomenon whose sufferers desperately struggle to keep up and meet their own expectations — with dangerous consequences for their health.

Now They're Diagnosing Burnout's Never-Quit Cousin: Burn-On

Burn-out is the result of sustained periods of stress at work

Beate Strobel

At first glance, Mr L seems to be a successful man with a well-rounded life: middle management, happily married, father of two. If you ask him how he is, he responds with a smile and a “Fine thanks”. But everything is not fine. When he was admitted to the psychosomatic clinic Kloster Diessen, Mr L described his emotional life as hollow and empty.

Although outwardly he is still putting on a good face, he has been privately struggling for some time. Everything that used to bring him joy and fun has become simply another chore. He can hardly remember what it feels like to enjoy his life.

For psychotherapist Professor Bert te Wildt, who heads the psychosomatic clinic in Ammersee in Bavaria, Germany, the symptoms of Patient L. make him a prime example of a new and so far under-researched syndrome, that he calls “burn-on”. Working with psychologist Timo Schiele, he has published his findings about the phenomenon in a book, Burn-On.

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