When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!
InterNations -Your expat community

AL ARABIYA (Saudi Arabia/Egypt), MASRAWY (Egypt)

Worldcrunch

CAIRO – At least 16 people have been injured in and around Tahrir Square as both protesters and Egyptian police geared up for major demonstrations Friday to mark two years since the Arab world's uprising coalesced in the region's largest country on Jan. 25, 2011.

Ahead of what are expected to be major protests called to follow Friday’s prayer, it was the Ultras Ahlawy (violent supporters of Egypt's biggest soccer club) who led the preliminary protests on Wednesday and Thursday as a warning to the government as to today’s mobilization.

Your precious souls that you sacrificed for us will not go to waste, rest in peace, revenge is on the way,” they tweeted Wednesday.

لن تذهب دمائكم الغالية هدرا،استريحوا Ù�Ù‰ قبوركم اصدقائكم بالمرصاد #ïº�ï»Ÿï»¤ïº ïºªï»Ÿï» ïº¸ï»¬ïºªïº�ﺀ#القصاص#UA07

— UltrasAhlawy (@UltrasAhlawy07) January 23, 2013

Clashes in the capital resulted in 16 injured, a Ministry of Health official told Al Arabiya.

The calls for protests were encouraged by opposition leaders such as Mohamed El Baradei, head of Al Dostour party, who said Friday that the removal of President Mohamed Morsi should not be the focus of the demonstration.

Let’s get out and demand the realization of the objectives of the revolution,” he said on Twitter.

لنخرج للميادين لإستكمال أهدا� الثورةaldostourparty.org

— Mohamed ElBaradei (@ElBaradei) January 24, 2013

As for the government, no official declarations were made in the lead-up to the anniversary, with Morsi focused on promoting his visit to the Suez Canal, reports Masrawy.

Here's how it looked two years ago:

[rebelmouse-image 27086192 alt="""" original_size="640x480" expand=1]

Photo Ramy Raoof

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Already a subscriber? Log in
Ideas

The Latin American Left Is Back, But More Fractured Than Ever

The Left is constantly being hailed as the resurgent power in Latin America. But there is no unified Left in the region. The "movement" is diverse — and its divisons are growing.

Photo of a woman walking by a wall with street art of Venezuelan presidents Maduro and Chavez in Caracas

Street art of Venezuelan presidents Maduro and Chavez in Caracas

Farid Kahhat

-Analysis-

LIMA — Lula da Silva's reelection to the presidency in Brazil is the 25th consecutive democratic election in Latin America in which the ruling party has lost power. There appears to be general discontent with ruling parties, caused partly by external factors: the world's worst pandemic in a century, the worst recession since the 1990s, and sharpest inflation rate in 40 years.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Already a subscriber? Log in

The latest

InterNations