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REUTERS, TIMES OF INDIA(India)

Worldcrunch

GUWAHATI - Tens of thousands villagers have fled their homes in northeast India after clashes between indigenous tribes and Muslim settlers killed at least 17 people during the weekend.

Between 25,000 and 50,000 villagers have fled their homes and taken shelter in government-run camps, after unidentified groups set ablaze houses, schools, and vehicles, and started firing indiscriminately with automatic weapons in populated areas.

Sparking the clashes on Friday night, unidentified men killed four youths on Friday night in the Bodo tribe-dominated Kokrajhar district, police and district officials told Reuters. In retaliation, armed Bodos attacked Muslim settlers, suspecting them to be behind the killings.

Rioting erupted in the remote state of Assam, close to the borders with Bhutan and Bangladesh, a region that has been the scene of decades of friction between the Bodo tribe and Muslim settlers, the Indian daily newspaper Times Of India reports -- although some of the biggest rebel movements have recently started peace talks with the government.

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Green

Fading Flavor: Production Of Saffron Declines Sharply

Saffron is well-known for its flavor and its expense. But in Kashmir, one of the flew places it grows, cultivation has fallen dramatically thanks for climate change, industry, and farming methods.

Photo of women harvesting saffron in Kashmir

Harvesting of Saffron in Kashmir

Mubashir Naik

In northern India along the bustling Jammu-Srinagar national highway near Pampore — known as the saffron town of Kashmir —people are busy picking up saffron flowers to fill their wicker baskets.

During the autumn season, this is a common sight in the Valley as saffron harvesting is celebrated like a festival in Kashmir. The crop is harvested once a year from October 21 to mid-November.

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