When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Cheering in New York on Nov. 7
Cheering in New York on Nov. 7

It's Joe! After the world watched for four days as the United States counted its votes, Joe Biden has clinched victory over Donald Trump in one of the most consequential presidential elections in American history. Trump's four tumultuous years in the White House are now bound to end, even if the outgoing president has vowed to contest the result and is sure to make the transition to a new administration anything but smooth.

Still the verdict from the voters has been acknowledged by world leaders, who formally congratulated Biden. Further confirming the reality, newspapers around the world splashed the news across their front pages. Here's a sampling of 46 newspapers for the incoming 46th president, from India and Italy to Austria and Argentina, as well as Biden's native city of Scranton and home state of Delaware :

USA

The Washington Post

The New York Times

Kansas City Star

New York Post

Delaware News Journal

The Sunday Times (Scranton, PA)



CANADA

The Toronto Star

Le Journal de Montréal



ARGENTINA

Clarin

Diario Hoy

La Nacion



BRAZIL

A Tarde

Jornal do Comercio



COLOMBIA

El Espectador



PERU

La Republica

El Comercio


SOUTH AFRICA


Sunday Times


UK

The Times

The Observer (The Guardian)

The Independent

The Sunday Telegraph



GERMANY

Berliner Morgenpost



AUSTRIA

Kleine Zeitung

Kronen Zeitung



FRANCE

L'Alsace

Le Parisien

Le Courrier Picard


IRELAND

Irish Independent



THE NETHERLANDS

De Volkskrant



NORWAY

Aftenposten



DENMARK

Politiken



ITALY

Corriere della Sera


SPAIN

El Pais

La Razon

El Periodico

ABC



PORTUGAL

Diario de Noticias

Publico



ISRAEL

The Jerusalem Post



IRAN

Shargh daily



JORDAN

Al Ghad



SAUDI ARABIA

Al Madina



INDIA

Dainik Jagran

Hindustan Times



AUSTRALIA

The Sunday Times



NEW ZEALAND

Herald on Sunday

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Future

Injecting Feminism Into Science Is A Good Thing — For Science

Feminists have generated a set of tools to make science less biased and more robust. Why don’t more scientists use it?

As objective as any man

Anto Magzan/ZUMA
Rachel E. Gross

-Essay-

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, a mystery played out across news headlines: Men, it seemed, were dying of infection at twice the rate of women. To explain this alarming disparity, researchers looked to innate biological differences between the sexes — for instance, protective levels of sex hormones, or distinct male-female immune responses. Some even went so far as to test the possibility of treating infected men with estrogen injections.

This focus on biological sex differences turned out to be woefully inadequate, as a group of Harvard-affiliated researchers pointed out earlier this year. By analyzing more than a year of sex-disaggregated COVID-19 data, they showed that the gender gap was more fully explained by social factors like mask-wearing and distancing behaviors (less common among men) and testing rates (higher among pregnant women and health workers, who were largely female).

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ