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THE KOREA HERALD (South Korea), THE FINANCIAL TIMES (UK)

Worldcrunch

Samsung Electronics confirmed Tuesday that it has filed papers with a U.S. court that accuse Apple's iPhone 5 of infringing its patents.

The South Korean electronics giant alleges that the new iPhone 5, launched September 21, infringes eight of its patents, including its wireless data technology. It was the latest salvo in a global battle over copyright and the billion-dollar smart phone and tablet market.

Samsung released a statement Tuesday, saying: "We have always preferred to compete in the marketplace with our innovative products, rather than in courtrooms. However, Apple continues to take aggressive legal measures that will limit market competition," the Korea Herald reports.

Samsung added there was "little choice but to take the steps necessary to protect our innovations and intellectual property rights.""

The announcement came just hours after the same court in California lifted a sales ban on Samsung's tablet device, Galaxy Tab 10.1. On August 25, the court had ruled in favor of Apple and ordered Samsung to pay $1 billion in damages, after determining that Samsung had infringed patents held by Apple.

Mark Newman, a previous employer at Samsung and analyst at Sanford C Bernstein, told the Financial Times: “They’re doing it to give them more leverage against Apple in the rest of the litigation process. Both parties will keep fighting tooth and nail in the courtroom, but it’s unlikely to result in significant product bans.”

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Geopolitics

North Korea And Nukes: Why The World Is Obliged To Try To Negotiate

How to handle a nuclear armed pariah state is not a simple question.

North Korea And Nukes: Why The World Is Obliged To Try To Negotiate

North Korea's missile launch during a news program at the Yongsan Railway Station in Seoul

Alexander Gillespie

The recent claim by Kim Jong Un that North Korea plans to develop the world’s most powerful nuclear force may well have been more bravado than credible threat. But that doesn’t mean it can be ignored.

The best guess is that North Korea now has sufficient fissile material to build 45 to 55 nuclear weapons, three decades after beginning its program. The warheads would mostly have yields of around 10 to 20 kilotons, similar to the 15 kiloton bomb that destroyed Hiroshima in 1945.

But North Korea has the capacity to make devices ten times bigger. Its missile delivery systems are also advancing in leaps and bounds. The technological advance is matched in rhetoric and increasingly reckless acts, including test-firing missiles over Japan in violation of all international norms, provoking terror and risking accidental war.

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