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"Water On Mars" Front Pages From Planet Earth

Plus, bonus coverage from the *celestial* hometown rag ...

"Water On Mars" Front Pages From Planet Earth
Bertrand Hauger

Water ahoy! NASA has confirmed the existence of flowing salty water on present-day Mars, fueling hopes — and worries? — of possible life on the red planet.

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has provided the strongest evidence yet that liquid water flows on the planet's surface during warm seasons.

According to The New York Times, the discovery represents a shift for NASA, where officials have repeatedly played down the notion that the dusty and desolate landscape of Mars could be inhabited today, as water resources could prove vital for future human explorers.

The news made the rounds on another planet:

USA

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USA Today

[rebelmouse-image 27089458 alt="""" original_size="750x1566" expand=1]

Los Angeles Times


FRANCE

[rebelmouse-image 27089459 alt="""" original_size="750x937" expand=1]

"Drip, drip, is anybody there?" — Libération

[rebelmouse-image 27089460 alt="""" original_size="750x1109" expand=1]

"We've found water on Mars" — L'Alsace


BRASIL

[rebelmouse-image 27089461 alt="""" original_size="240x415" expand=1]

"Marsea" — Folha de S. Paulo


UK

[rebelmouse-image 27089462 alt="""" original_size="750x965" expand=1]

The Times


ARGENTINA

[rebelmouse-image 27089463 alt="""" original_size="750x1041" expand=1]

"Hopes for life on Mars discovered" — Clarin


CHINA

[rebelmouse-image 27089464 alt="""" original_size="750x1091" expand=1]

"Proof of flowing water on Mars" — Oriental Morning Post


SOUTH AFRICA

[rebelmouse-image 27089465 alt="""" original_size="750x1097" expand=1]

The Star


BONUS: MARS

Marsgazine

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Geopolitics

Winning African Hearts And Minds? Why Russia Has An Edge Over The West

Russia's Foreign Minister is in South Africa for the second time in a year. In spite of the West's best efforts, Vladimir Putin's delegation is still welcomed in large parts of Africa, which still harbors colonial resentment toward Europe.

Photo of Sergey Lavrov during his visit to South Africa

Russia's Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and South Africa's Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor shake hands

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Sergey Lavrov, Russia's Foreign Minister, has not traveled much since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. But he arrived yesterday on an official visit to South Africa, his second official trip there in a year.

But it is not a coincidence: Africa is a priority for Russian diplomacy.

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The West was caught off guard when, at the United Nations last year, a large part of Africa refused to condemn the Russian aggression on Ukrainian territory. They were all the more surprised because, since the 1960s, the African continent has wisely adopted a principle recognizing the borders inherited from colonization: it wanted to avoid possible inter-state targeting, which is what Russia is trying to do in Ukraine.

Moscow has been able to capitalize on this refusal of Africa to align itself with the West.

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