BUSINESS INSIDER

Mobile-Ready: How Google Has Again Cornered The Market On Search

Thanks to Android boom and strategic mistakes at Microsoft, Bing search is even further behind Google on mobile devices.

Mobile-Ready: How Google Has Again Cornered The Market On Search
Jay Yarow

Here's a quiet bombshell from comScore.

Total core organic desktop search was down on a year over year basis for the fourth straight month in December.

Ben Schachter of Macquarie has the latest comScore stats in a research report. He says mobile and vertical search — retail, travel, social — are killing the traditional desktop search business.

"We estimate that as much as 25-30% of all Internet search traffic could be coming from mobile devices as of year-end. Moreover, in certain categories, such as restaurants, we believe that well more than 30% of queries are already coming from mobile devices (other key categories such as Consumer Electronics, Beauty & Personal, Finance/Insurance, and Autos also have a meaningful share of mobile queries)," says Schachter.

This isn't good news for Google, but it's not entirely bad news either.

The bad news: Mobile search isn't as lucrative for Google as desktop search right now. And on mobile, the importance of apps drives a wedge into Google's search business.

The good news: Google completely dominates search on mobile with something like 90 percent or more of share. It's the default search engine on the iPhone and its default on Android, the most popular mobile operating system. It's well positioned to take advantage of a mobile transition.

Microsoft, on the other hand, is not. It has burned billions trying to make Bing relevant on the desktop. That effort has yielded some positive-ish results.

The latest comScore data gives Bing 16.3 percent of the search market, which is only up from 16.2 percent a year ago. It's had 32 straight months of flat or growing desktop search share. That's good, but it hasn't killed Google, which is near its all time high with 66.7 percent of the desktop search market.

In fact, Bing's relative strength may have helped Google argue that it didn't have a monopoly in search when the FTC investigated it.

That's a minor detail.

The big picture is that Microsoft burned billions fighting for the desktop search market right when the world was preparing to abandon desktop search.

We've reached out to Microsoft and Google for comment, but haven't heard back. When, or if, they say something interesting we'll either update this post or write another story.

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Geopolitics

Why Ghosts Of Hitler Keep Appearing In Colombia

Colombia's police chiefs must be dismally ignorant if they think it was "instructive" to expose young cadets bereft of historical education to Nazi symbols.

Nazi symbols were displayed in public at the Tuluá Police Academy

Reinaldo Spitaletta

-OpEd-

BOGOTÁ — Adolf Hitler was seen in 1954, wandering around the chilly town of Tunja, northeast of the Colombian capital. The führer was, they said, all cloaked up like a peasant — they even took a picture of him. Later, he was spotted nearby at the baths in the spa town of Paipa, no doubt there for his fragile health.

A former president and notorious arch-conservative of 20th century Colombian politics, Laureano Gómez used to pay him homage. A fascist at heart, Gómez had to submit to the United States as the victor of World War II. He wasn't the only fascist sympathizer in Colombia then. Other conservatives, writers and intellectuals were fascinated by Nazism.

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