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HAMBURGER ABENDBLATT, PRESSETEXTE(Germany)

Worldcrunch

HAMBURG - Aggressive dreams and other unusual sleep-related activity may be an early warning sign that someone will develop Parkinson’s disease, according to a new German neurology study, the Hamburger Abendblatt reports.

At the annual convention of German neurologists this week in Hamburg, Prof. Wolfgang Oertel of the University of Marburg described patients with aggressive behavior in their sleep: kicks, blows, and screams. According to Oertel, the symptoms of aggression during sleep arise during the REM (Rapid Eye Movement) phase, usually in the second half of the night. Most of the patients with such symptoms are over 50, and 87.5 % are men.

“Someone who moves and talks while asleep has a 60 to 70% chance of getting Parkinson’s or a multiple system atrophy (MSA) within 10 to 30 years,” Oertel told Pressetext, a German news agency.

The patients, whose REMs are also abnormal, begin to have violent dreams where they feel they must defend themselves, often hurting themselves or the person they are sleeping with.

Oertel says that people with such dreams should go to a sleep or neurological center to be tested. There is no treatment as yet, but early detection greatly improves the prognosis for neurological diseases.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Overselling The Russia-Ukraine Grain Deal Is One More Putin Scam

Moscow and Kyiv reached a much hailed accord in July to allow transport of Ukrainian agricultural output from ports along the Black Sea. However, analysis from Germany's Die Welt and Ukraine's Livy Bereg shows that it has done little so far to solve the food crisis, and is instead being used by Putin to advance his own ambitions.

Vladimir Putin inspecting the wheat harvesting at the village of Vyselki, Krasnodar Territory in 2009.

Oleksandr Decyk, Christian Putsch

-Analysis-

Brokered by Turkey on July 22, the Grain Deal between Russia and Ukraine ensured the export of Ukrainian agricultural products from the country's largest sea ports. Exports by sea of grains and oilseeds have been increasing. Optimistic reports, featuring photos of the first deliveries to Africa, are circulating about how the risk of a global food crisis has been averted.

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But a closer look shows a different story. The Black Sea ports are not fully opened, which will impact not only Ukraine. The rest of the world can expect knock-on effects, including potentially hunger for millions. Indeed, a large proportion of the deliveries are not going to Africa at all.

As with other reported "breakthroughs" in the war, Vladimir Putin has other objectives in mind — and is still holding on to all his cards.

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