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How Hypnosis Can Change Your Life, One Day At A Time

Falsely considered a type of magic, achieving hypnotic trance is already part of our everyday lives. Its potential applications for medical science are vast, if still largely unexplained.

At the count of three, I will wake up...
At the count of three, I will wake up...
KJ
Nic Ulmi

GENEVA — What exactly is hypnotic? The music that the Balinese expand=1] gamelan plays? Matthew McConaughey's voice in True expand=1] Detective? Kim Novak’s chignon in Vertigo? The lights on the dance floor in a nightclub? Every time we use this term figuratively, we are actually unwittingly very close to the truth.

Far from its colorful imagery in movies, from The Thousand Eyes of Dr. Mabuse to the Jungle Book, a hypnotic state is a common thing, in the most literal sense of the word. “Everyone is familiar with it,” says Jean-Michel Jakobowicz, a Geneva-based hypnotherapist, and author of L’autohypnose, C’est Malin (“Self-Hypnosis is Clever”, untranslated), a handy book that comes with a series of downloadable recordings.

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Ideas

García Márquez And Truth: How Journalism Fed The Novelist's Fantasy

In his early journalistic writings, the Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez showed he had an eye for factual details, in which he found the absurdity and 'magic' that would in time be the stuff and style of his fiction.

Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez reads his book

J. D. Torres Duarte

BOGOTÁ — In short stories written in the 1940s and early 50s and later compiled in Eyes of a Blue Dog, the late Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia's Nobel Prize-winning novelist, shows he is as yet a young writer, with a style and subjects that can be atypical.

Stylistically, García Márquez came into his own in the celebrated One Hundred Years of Solitude. Until then both his style and substance took an erratic course: touching the brevity of film scripts in Nobody Writes to the Colonel, technical experimentation in Leaf Storm, the anecdotal short novel in In Evil Hour or exploring politics in Big Mama's Funeral. Throughout, the skills he displayed were rather of a precocious juggler.

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