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LE MONDE (France), TORONTO STAR, RABBLE (Canada)

Worldcrunch

According to Canadian expert in copyright, Michael Geist, the European Commission is planning to implement the recently rejected provisions of ACTA with a clever little workaround: by applying the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA).

The Canadian publication Rabble reports that Canada and the European Union are trying to ratify the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement through the backdoor.

Michael Geist, who is also the Toronto Star"s Internet legal affairs columnist, stated: "The European Commission strategy appears to use CETA as the new ACTA, burying its provisions in a broader Canadian trade agreement with the hope that the European Parliament accepts the same provisions it just rejected with the ACTA framework."

On his blog, Mr Geist presents the similarities between ACTA and CETA provisions, mainly concerning the Internet Provider Liability, the Civil and Criminal Enforcement, as well as the Border Measures.

French daily Le Monde points out that according to leaked documents from February 2012, the CETA agreement will oblige Internet providers to disclose the identity of their users suspected of piracy.

Dubbed "ACTA's Trojan horse" by several European websites, CETA is currently in its last stage of negotiation.

As for the ACTA treaty, which the European MPs massively rejected in the voting session last week, it is to be examined by the European Court of Justice. ACTA could be re-examined by the EU Parliament, if the Court decides it respects fundamental rights.

In the meantime, reaction was fierce in Europe to reports of this Plan B for anti-piracy policy:

French Indignados' reaction on CETA: "Europe thinks you are idiots'

"Brussels is trying to cancel the rejection of ACTA. Did you say European democracy???"

"Goodbye ACTA, hello CETA; A new struggle begins."

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Society

Journalism In A Zero-Trust World: Maria Ressa Speaks After Rappler Shut Down Again

The Rappler CEO and Nobel Peace Prize winner spoke with The Wire's Arfa Khanum Sherwani about how journalists everywhere need to prepare themselves for the worst-case scenario of government-ordered closure and what they should do to face up to such a challenge.

Maria Ressa, Filipino journalist, author and Nobel Peace Prize laureate

Arfa Khanum Sherwani

HONOLULU — For someone who’s just been ordered to shut down the news website she runs, Rappler CEO Maria Ressa is remarkably cheerful about what may happen next.

In a speech she gave to a conference at the East-West Center here on challenges the media face in a “zero trust world”, Ressa said that she and her colleagues were prepared for this escalation in the Philippines government’s war on independent media and will carry on doing the work they do. “If you live in a country where the rule of law is bent to the point it’s broken, anything is possible…. So you have to be prepared.”

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