Going Green: 10 Carbon-Neutral Projects Around The World

“It’s not easy being green.” — Kermit expand=1] the Frog

PARIS - For some of us, being green is a hard-to-quantify choice of using a reusable bag at the grocery storetaking or taking public transport. But for others, environmental friendliness is a hard calculation to reach carbon-neutral status. That means removing as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as you put in.

For example, putting milk in your coffee actually increases it’s carbon footprint because, among other reasons, a truck had to drive the milk to your local coffee shop. If you wanted to decrease it, just drink it black. (And think about how much water you boil!) Three large lattes a day for a year produces 600kg of CO2e (Carbon Dioxide equivalent).

The goal of reducing global warming requires both small and big changes, from individuals and multinational companies. Here’s how some projects around the world are attempting to reverse their carbon footprints.

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Society

How The Top Collector Of Chinese Art Evades Censors In New Hong Kong Museum

Swiss businessman Uli Sigg is the most important collector of Chinese contemporary art. In 2012, he gave away most of his collection to the M+ in Hong Kong. Now the museum has opened as the Communist Party is cracking down hard on freedom of expression. So how do you run a museum in the face of widespread censorship from Beijing?

''Rouge 1992'' by Li Shan at the M+ museum

Maximilian Kalkhof

The first test has been passed, Uli Sigg thinks. So far, everything has gone well. His new exhibition has opened, visitors like to come, and — this is the most important thing for the Swiss businessman — everything is on display. He has not had to take an exhibit off the list of works.

The M+ in Hong Kong is a new museum that wants to compete with the established ones. It wants to surpass the MoMa in New York and Centre Pompidou in Paris. Sigg, a rather down-to-earth man, says: “There is no better museum in the whole world.” That is very much self-praise, since Sigg’s own collection is central to the museum.

The only problem is: great art is often political; it questions the rulers. Since the Chinese Communist Party has been cracking down on critics and freedom in Hong Kong, the metropolis is a bad place for politics and art. So how did the collection get there?

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