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Going Green: 10 Carbon-Neutral Projects Around The World

“It’s not easy being green.” — Kermit expand=1] the Frog

PARIS - For some of us, being green is a hard-to-quantify choice of using a reusable bag at the grocery storetaking or taking public transport. But for others, environmental friendliness is a hard calculation to reach carbon-neutral status. That means removing as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as you put in.

For example, putting milk in your coffee actually increases it’s carbon footprint because, among other reasons, a truck had to drive the milk to your local coffee shop. If you wanted to decrease it, just drink it black. (And think about how much water you boil!) Three large lattes a day for a year produces 600kg of CO2e (Carbon Dioxide equivalent).

The goal of reducing global warming requires both small and big changes, from individuals and multinational companies. Here’s how some projects around the world are attempting to reverse their carbon footprints.

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War In Ukraine, Day 279: New Kherson Horrors More Than Two Weeks After Russian Withdrawal

Shelling in Kherson

Anna Akage, Bertrand Hauger and Emma Albright

While retreating from Kherson, Russian troops forcibly removed more than 2,500 Ukrainians from prison colonies and pre-trial detention centers in the southern region. Those removed included prisoners as well as a large number of civilians who had been held in prisons during the occupation, according to the Ukrainian human rights organization Alliance of Ukrainian Unity.

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The NGO said it has evidence that these Ukrainians were first transferred to Crimea and then distributed to different prisons in Russia. During the transfer of the prisoners, Russian soldiers also reportedly stole valuables and food and mined the building of colony #61.

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