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Extra! How The World Press Reported Moon Landing 50 Years Ago

A half-century later, Neil Armstrong's 'great leap' still boggles the mind. Here's a look back at some of the headlines that followed the historic feat.

Buzz Aldrin making headlines
Buzz Aldrin making headlines

PARIS — The date was July 20, 1969, the clock read 10:56 p.m. on the East Coast of the United States, as much of the world tuned in by radio or television to follow NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong take that historic-making first step on the moon.

On the 50th anniversary of that historic landing, we look back at how the event was covered in the press. In a time before smartphones and the internet, people all over the world were united by the experience of watching or listening to Armstrong's "giant leap" — or reading about it just afterwards in the press.

As those first steps were broadcasted live, newspapers began reporting one of the most momentous events in human history. By the following morning, a Monday, headlines in papers from Mexico, to Bulgaria, to South Africa proclaimed Apollo 11's improbable accomplishment.

Below is a collection front pages (and a few magazine covers) from around the world announcing nothing less than the dawn of a new era.

THE UNITED STATES

The New York Times

The Miami News

The Daily Tribune

Chicago Tribune


MEXICO

El Universal


BRAZIL

O Povo

Folha De S. Paulo


IRELAND

The Irish Times

The Irish Press


THE UNITED KINGDOM

The Daily Post

Daily Express


FRANCE

France Soir

Le Monde

Le Soir


THE NETHERLANDS

Algemeen Dagblad

Trouw

Het Parool

de Buzz Krant

Provinciale Zeeuwse Courant


SWEDEN

Aftonbladet

Dagens Nyheter


NORWAY

Dagbladet


DENMARK

Berlingske Tidende


GERMANY

Bild

Der Abend


ITALY

Il Messaggero


AUSTRIA

Arbeiter-Zeitung


POLAND

Nowości


YUGOSLAVIA

Borba


BULGARIA

Rabotnichesko Delo


TURKEY

Cumhuriyet


SOVIET UNION (MOSCOW)

Pravda


ISRAEL

Haaretz

The Jerusalem Post


SOUTH KOREA

Kyunghyang Shinmun


JAPAN

The Japan Times

Yomiuri Shimbun​


THAILAND

The Bangkok Post


SOUTH VIETNAM

The Saigon Post


AUSTRALIA

The Sydney Morning Herald


SOUTH AFRICA

The Cape Times


MAGAZINES

FRANCE

Paris Match


THE UNITED STATES

Time Magazine


ITALY

Epoca


BRAZIL

Veja


GERMANY

Stern

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Society

Dutch Cities Have Been Secretly Probing Mosques Since 2013

Revelations of a nationally funded clandestine operation within 10 municipalities in the Netherlands to keep tabs on mosques and Muslim organizations after a rise in radicalization eight years ago.

The Nasser mosque in Veenendaal, one of the mosques reportedly surveilled

Meike Eijsberg

At least ten Dutch towns and cities have secretly used a private agency to probe mosques and other local religious organizations, Amsterdam-based daily het NRC reports in an exclusive investigation.

The clandestine operation — funded by NCTV, the National Security Services, the Netherlands' leading counter-terrorism agency — was prompted by the social unrest and uncertainty following multiple terror attacks in 2013, and a rise in Islamic radicalization.


The NCTV, which advises and financially supports municipalities in countering radicalization, put the municipalities in touch with Nuance by Training and Advice (Nuance door Trainingen en Advies, NTA), a private research agency based in Deventer, Netherlands. Among the institutions targeted by the investigations, which came at a cost of circa 500,000 euros, were the Al Mouahidin mosque in the central Dutch town of Ede, and the Nasser mosque east of the city of Utrecht, according to NRC.

Photo of people standing on prayer mats inside a Dutch mosque

Praying inside a Dutch mosque.

Hollandse-Hoogte/ZUMA

Broken trust in Islamic community

Unlike public officials, the private agency can enter the mosques to clandestinely research the situation. In this case, the agents observed activity, talk to visitors, administrators, and religious leaders, and investigated what they do and say on social media.

All findings then wound up in a secret report which includes personal details about what the administrators and teachers studied, who their relatives are, with whom they argued, and how often they had contact with authorities in foreign countries, like Morocco.

Leaders of the Muslim organizations that were secretly probed say they feel betrayed.

It is unclear whether the practice is legal, which is why several members of the Dutch Parliament are now demanding clarification from the outgoing Minister of Justice and Security, Ferd Grapperhaus, who is said to be involved.

"The ease with which the government violates (fundamental) rights when it comes to Islam or Muslims is shocking," Stephan van Baarle, member of the leftist party DENK, told De Volkskrant, another Dutch newspaper.

Leaders of the Muslim organizations that were secretly probed say they feel betrayed. Hassan Saidi, director of one of the mosques investigated, said that the relationship with the local municipality had been good. "This puts a huge dent in the trust I'd had in the municipality," he told the Dutch public broadcaster NOS.

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