THE NEW VISION (Uganda), CHANNELS TV (Nigeria), BBC (UK)

Worldcrunch

An outbreak of the Ebola virus has emerged in rural western Uganda.

19 cases of the deadly virus were reported at Kibaale Hospital on Tuesday morning, Uganda's daily The New Vision reported. Fourteen people have died from the virus in the past three weeks, one of whom died in the capital city Kampala.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni told the press on Monday that seven doctors and 13 health workers from Mulago Hospital in Kampala have been put under quarantine after having treated patients with the virus.

Nigeria's Channels TV reported that President Museveni warned people to avoid shaking-hands, sexual contact and makeshift burials to prevent contracting the virus.

A health officer in the area told the television station that up to 80,000 people could be at risk of contracting the disease, which causes nausea, fever and both internal and external bleeding.

The virus takes its name from the Ebola River in DR Congo, where it was first found in 1976. In 2000, more than 200 people died in an outbreak in Uganda.

Scientists also fear that an outbreak of a strain of influenza found in seals off the coast of New England could pose a threat to humans.

Researching the deaths of 162 seals, scientists have discovered that the H3N8 strain of flu has been passed on to the species from North American birds.

Dr Anne Moscona of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City told the BBC: "There is a concern that we have a new mammalian-transmissable virus to which humans haven't yet been exposed. It's a combination we haven't seen in disease before."

The virus has potential to pass from species to species with severe symptoms.

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Geopolitics

Taliban Redux, Cleaned-Up Image Can't Mask Their Cruel Reality

Twenty years later the Islamist group is back in power in Afghanistan, but trying this time to win international support. Now that several months have passed, experts on the ground can offer a clear assessment if the group has genuinely transformed on such issues as women's rights and free speech.

The Taliban have now been in power for almost five months

Atal Ahmadzai and Faten Ghosn

The international community is closely monitoring the Taliban, after the group re-seized power in Afghanistan in August 2021.

There is legitimate reason for concern. The Taliban are again ruling through fear and draconian rules.

The Taliban’s last regime, in the mid-1990s, was marked by human rights violations, including massacres, mass detentions and rape. The regime collapsed on Nov. 14, 2001, shortly after the U.S. launched its global war on terrorism.

Even after the Taliban officially fell from power, their subsequent two decades of insurgency produced various gross human rights violations, an encompassing term under international human rights law.

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