MANDIANT, NEW YORK TIMES, CNN (USA)

Worldcrunch

An American cybersecurity firm has linked more than 100 cyber attacks on U.S. companies to to the Chinese government.

In a 60-page long document entitled APT1: Exposing One of China's Cyber Espionage Units,, the Virginia-based firm Mandiant traced 147 cases of corporate cyber espionage over a six-year period back to a group of hackers called the "Comment Crew," the New York Times reports.

The hackers drained hundreds of terabytes of data from companies like Coca-Cola, but also targeted firms with links to pipelines and power grids in the U.S., as well as computer security firms.

CNN reports that the activity can be traced to four networks near Shanghai -- with some operations taking place in a 12-story building that is also the headquarters of Unit 61398, a secret division of China's military.

Officials at the Chinese embassy in Washington have denied any involvment, insisting that hacking is illegal under Chinese law: "Making baseless accusations based on premature analysis is irresponsible and unprofessional," Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei said.

"China resolutely opposes any form of hacking activities," Lei said, adding that China was the victim of many cyberattacks -- most originating in the United States.

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China

Peng Shuai, A Reckoning China's Communist Party Can't Afford To Face

The mysterious disappearance – and brief reappearance – of the Chinese tennis star after her #metoo accusation against a party leader shows Beijing is prepared to do whatever is necessary to quash any challenge from its absolute rule.

Fears are growing about the safety and whereabouts of Peng Shuai

Yan Bennett and John Garrick

Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai's apparent disappearance may have ended with a smattering of public events, which were carefully curated by state-run media and circulated in online clips. But many questions remain about the three weeks in which she was missing, and concerns linger over her well-being.

Peng, a former Wimbledon and French Open doubles champion, had been out of the public eye since Nov. 2. 2021 when she penned a since-deleted social media post accusing former Chinese Vice-Premier Zhang Gaoli of sexual misconduct.

In the U.S. and Europe, such moments of courage from high-profile women have built momentum to out perpetrators of sexual harassment and assault and give a voice to those wronged. But in the political context of today's People's Republic of China (PRC) – a country that tightly controls political narratives within and outside its borders – something else happened. Peng was seemingly silenced; her #MeToo allegation was censored almost as soon as it was made.

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