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MANDIANT, NEW YORK TIMES, CNN (USA)

Worldcrunch

An American cybersecurity firm has linked more than 100 cyber attacks on U.S. companies to to the Chinese government.

In a 60-page long document entitled APT1: Exposing One of China's Cyber Espionage Units,, the Virginia-based firm Mandiant traced 147 cases of corporate cyber espionage over a six-year period back to a group of hackers called the "Comment Crew," the New York Times reports.

The hackers drained hundreds of terabytes of data from companies like Coca-Cola, but also targeted firms with links to pipelines and power grids in the U.S., as well as computer security firms.

CNN reports that the activity can be traced to four networks near Shanghai -- with some operations taking place in a 12-story building that is also the headquarters of Unit 61398, a secret division of China's military.

Officials at the Chinese embassy in Washington have denied any involvment, insisting that hacking is illegal under Chinese law: "Making baseless accusations based on premature analysis is irresponsible and unprofessional," Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei said.

"China resolutely opposes any form of hacking activities," Lei said, adding that China was the victim of many cyberattacks -- most originating in the United States.

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Geopolitics

Olaf Scholz: Trying To Crack The Code Of Germany's Enigmatic Chancellor

Olaf Scholz took over for Angela Merkel a year ago, but for many he remains a mysterious figure through a series of tumultuous events, including his wavering on the war in Ukraine.

man boarding a plane

Olaf Scholz boading an Air Force Special Air Mission Wing plane, on his way to the EU-Western Balkans Summit in Tirana.

Michael Kappeler / dpa via ZUMA Press
Peter Huth

-Analysis-

BERLIN — When I told my wife that I was planning to write an article about “a year of Scholz,” she said, “Who’s that?” To be fair, she misheard me, and over the last 12 months the German Chancellor has mainly been referred to by his first name, Olaf.

Still, it’s a reasonable question. Who is Olaf Scholz, really? Or perhaps we should ask: how many versions of Olaf Scholz are there? A year after taking over from Angela Merkel, we still don’t know.

Chancellors from Germany’s Social Democrat Party (SPD) have always been easy to characterize. First there was Willy Brandt – he suffered from depression and had an intriguing private life. His affected public speaking style is still the gold standard for anyone who wants to get ahead in the center-left party. Then came Helmut Schmidt. He lived off his reputation for handling any crisis, smoked like a chimney and eventually won over the public.

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