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MANDIANT, NEW YORK TIMES, CNN (USA)

Worldcrunch

An American cybersecurity firm has linked more than 100 cyber attacks on U.S. companies to to the Chinese government.

In a 60-page long document entitled APT1: Exposing One of China's Cyber Espionage Units,, the Virginia-based firm Mandiant traced 147 cases of corporate cyber espionage over a six-year period back to a group of hackers called the "Comment Crew," the New York Times reports.

The hackers drained hundreds of terabytes of data from companies like Coca-Cola, but also targeted firms with links to pipelines and power grids in the U.S., as well as computer security firms.

CNN reports that the activity can be traced to four networks near Shanghai -- with some operations taking place in a 12-story building that is also the headquarters of Unit 61398, a secret division of China's military.

Officials at the Chinese embassy in Washington have denied any involvment, insisting that hacking is illegal under Chinese law: "Making baseless accusations based on premature analysis is irresponsible and unprofessional," Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei said.

"China resolutely opposes any form of hacking activities," Lei said, adding that China was the victim of many cyberattacks -- most originating in the United States.

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Russia

No Putin, No Russia? Why Losing The War Wouldn't Destroy The Russian Federation

Predictions about the collapse of Russia are as old as the country itself. Yet a consistent centralization of power has gone on for decades, weakening Russia's territories and republics. The war in Ukraine changes everything and nothing.

Photo of a Russian flag during Unity Day celebrations

Russian unity day celebrations

Aleksandr Kynev

-Analysis-

The prediction “Russia is about to fall apart” has been a mainstay of the political science-futurist genre for the 30 years since the end of the USSR and establishment of the Russian Federation.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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Now, the war with Ukraine has drastically reduced the time-frame for such apocalyptic forecasts to come true. First, because it turns out that Russia can very well lose the war; and secondly, a defeat would weaken Vladimir Putin’s regime — and who knows if he will retain power at all?

“No Putin, no Russia” is a more recent refrain.

This line of thinking says that the weakening of the central government will push the regions to act independently. Yet noted political scientist Alexander Kynev explained in an interview with Vazhnyye Istorii why he doesn't believe anything like this will happen. The collapse of Russia is unlikely even if Putin loses.

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