AMÉRICA ECONOMÍA (Chile)

Worldcrunch

BOGOTA - Though few have ever heard of BYD, the Chinese industrial conglomerate has more than twice as many employees as Apple. Now, on the other side of the world, visitors and residents in Bogota are getting to know BYD well, after it began supplying the Colombian capital with Latin America's first electric taxis.

BYD is one of just a handful of companies globally to produce completely electric cars, América Economia reports. The company's strength comes as the largest producers of rechargable batteries in the world, which gave it a huge advantage when it decided to enter the electric car market by acquiring an auto maker in 2003.

[rebelmouse-image 27086315 alt="""" original_size="320x240" expand=1] Bogota by night - Traffic! photo: Jose Gacel

Colombia has already authorized 49 electric taxis in the capital, and it hoping that this first foray into electric taxis will expand into all the cities in the country, as a way to help reduce dependance on fossil fuels, América Economia reports.

Colombia follows Mexico and Chile into the market of electric taxis. BYD has also recently agreed to supply its green vehicles to London.

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Society

Germany's Legendary Clubbing Culture Crashes Museum Space

The exhibition “Electro” in Düsseldorf is an unlikely tribute to a joyful and uninhibited club culture, with curators forced to contend with limits of a museum setting ... and another COVID lockdown.

A woman with a "Techno" tattoo in front of the famous Berghain

Boris Pofalla

DÜSSELDORF — The last party at the Berghain nightclub in Berlin lasted from Saturday evening until Monday morning. On the first weekend of December, some clubbers lined up for nine hours outside the former power plant – and still didn’t make it past the doormen. A friend said that dancing in the most famous techno club in the world on its last evening was like landing a spot in the last lifeboat to leave the sinking Titanic on 14 April 1912.

It is surely a coincidence that the first comprehensive exhibition charting the 100-year history of electronic music in Germany opened in the same week that nightclubs across the country were forced to close. It wasn’t planned that way, but it’s like opening an exhibition about the cultural history of alcohol the day after the introduction of prohibition.

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