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AMÉRICA ECONOMÍA (Chile)

Worldcrunch

BOGOTA - Though few have ever heard of BYD, the Chinese industrial conglomerate has more than twice as many employees as Apple. Now, on the other side of the world, visitors and residents in Bogota are getting to know BYD well, after it began supplying the Colombian capital with Latin America's first electric taxis.

BYD is one of just a handful of companies globally to produce completely electric cars, América Economia reports. The company's strength comes as the largest producers of rechargable batteries in the world, which gave it a huge advantage when it decided to enter the electric car market by acquiring an auto maker in 2003.

[rebelmouse-image 27086315 alt="""" original_size="320x240" expand=1] Bogota by night - Traffic! photo: Jose Gacel

Colombia has already authorized 49 electric taxis in the capital, and it hoping that this first foray into electric taxis will expand into all the cities in the country, as a way to help reduce dependance on fossil fuels, América Economia reports.

Colombia follows Mexico and Chile into the market of electric taxis. BYD has also recently agreed to supply its green vehicles to London.

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Ideas

How Turkey Can Bring Its Brain Drain Back Home

Turkey heads to the polls next year as it faces its worst economic crisis in decades. Disillusioned by corruption, many young people have already left. However, Turkey's disaffected young expats are still very attached to their country, and could offer the best hope for a new future for the country.

Photo of people on a passenger ferry on the Bosphorus, with Istanbul in the background

Leaving Istanbul?

Bekir Ağırdır*

-Analysis-

ISTANBUL — Turkey goes to the polls next June in crucial national elections. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is up against several serious challenges, as a dissatisfied electorate faces the worst economic crisis of his two-decade rule. The opposition is polling well, but the traditional media landscape is in the hands of the government and its supporters.

But against this backdrop, many, especially the young, are disillusioned with the country and its entire political system.

Young or old, people from every demographic, cultural group and class who worry about the future of Turkey are looking for something new. Relationships and dialogues between people from different political traditions and backgrounds are increasing. We all constantly feel the country's declining quality of life and worry about the prevalence of crime and lawlessness.

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