LA STAMPA

A Scientific Attempt To Solve The Shroud Of Turin Mystery

Professor Giulio Fanti has spent much of his life in search of a scientific explanation for the Shroud of Turin, the linen cloth that purports to bear the image of the crucified Jesus of Nazareth. He has now arrived at his best conclusion, which may requi

What do you see? And how did it get there?
What do you see? And how did it get there?

*NEWSBITES

TURIN - Once and for all, says an Italian scientist, it's time to solve the mystery of the Shroud of Turin, the centuries-old linen cloth that bears the image of a crucified man that tradition holds to be Jesus Christ.

A newly published study by Giulio Fanti -- professor of mechanical and thermic measurements at the University of Padua, who has made virtually a life's work of the puzzle -- zeroes in on as corona (energy) discharge as the most probable hypothesis to explain the formation of the body image.

In an article published in the American magazine Journal of Imaging Science and Technology, Fanti writes that this particular form of electromagnetic energy -- coming from Jesus Christ's resurrecting body -- might have formed the image.

"Ever since 1898, when the photographer Secondo Pia took the first photographs of the Turin Shroud, many researchers have advanced hypotheses to account for the body image creation," Fanti says.

In his article, he considers the most important hypotheses and confronts them with the 24 main features of the Shroud. He concludes that electromagnetic radiation was responsible for the formation of the image.

According to Fanti, the corona discharge hypothesis "meets all the peculiar features of the body image of the Shroud." But in order to obtain an image of that size, "a voltage of dozens of million of volts would have been necessary; or, leaving the scientific field, a phenomenon connected with the resurrection" might have occurred, says the professor.

Such is the delicate line between the science of faith, and faith in science.

Read more from La Stampa in Italian - Original article by Andrea Tornielli

Photo - Wikipedia

*Newsbites are digest items, not direct translations

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Geopolitics

REvil Bust: Is Russian Cybercrime Crackdown Just A Decoy From Ukraine?

This weekend’s unprecedented operation to dismantle the cybercriminal REvil network in Russia was carried out on a request and information from Washington. Occurring just as the two countries face off over the Russian threat to invade Ukraine raises more questions than it answers.

Kyiv blamed Russia for another cyber-attack that knocked out key Ukrainian government websites last week

Cameron Manley

The world’s attention was gripped last week by the rising risk of war at the Russia-Ukraine border, and what some have called the worst breakdown in relations between Moscow and Washington since the end of the Cold War. Yet by the end of the week, another major story was unfolding more quietly across Russia that may shed light on the high-stakes geopolitical maneuvering.

By Friday night, Russian security forces had raided 25 addresses in St. Petersburg, Moscow and several other regions south of the capital in an operation to dismantle the notorious REvil group, accused of some of the worst cyberattacks in recent years to hit targets in the U.S. and elsewhere in the West.

And by Saturday, Russian online media Interfax was reporting that the FSB Russian intelligence services revealed that it had in fact been the U.S. authorities who had informed Russia "about the leaders of the criminal community and their involvement in attacks on the information resources of foreign high-tech companies.”

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