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Germany

Germany, Our Pride And Angst Leading The Way On Refugees

Germany's welcoming of refugees is sending out a strong signal to the rest of Europe and the world. But there's hard work ahead in a country that knows the weight of history.

Refugees arriving at the Munich train station on Sep. 5
Refugees arriving at the Munich train station on Sep. 5
Jörg Eigendorf

-Analysis-

BERLIN — Photographs of three children, variously heartrending and touching, have helped bring us closer to the truth: the dead Syrian boy washed up on the beach; the girl with the black curly hair and the soft smile at the Munich train station; the blond boy holding a "Welcome" sign...

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Geopolitics

Is Odessa Next? Putin Sees A Gateway To Moldova — And Chance For Revenge

After the fall of Mariupol, Vladimir Putin appears to have his eye on another iconic southern coastal city, with a strong identity and strategic location.

Odessa after a missile attack

Vincenzo Circosta/ZUMA
Anna Akage

Air strikes on the port city of Odessa have become more frequent over the past three weeks, most often hitting residential buildings, shopping malls, and critical infrastructure rather than military targets. The missiles arrive from naval vessels on the Black Sea and across the sea from the nearby Crimean coast, with the toll including multiple civilian deaths and a growing sense of panic. In Odessa, fears are rising that it could follow Mariupol as Vladimir Putin’s next principal target.

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Since the beginning of the war, more than half of the population — about 500,000 people — have left the city, even as others are flowing into Odessa from other war-torn regions in southern Ukraine, where the situation is even worse: people from Nikolayev, Kherson, Crimea, and even from Moldovan Transnistria.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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