When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Future

Computers Claiming Copyright And Other Puzzles Of Our AI Era

Painter, musician, writer
Painter, musician, writer
Bertrand Hauger

-Analysis-

Do GIFs have a place in serious publications? Where the hell is my giraffe emoji? Do androids dream of electric sheep? The digital world is presenting us with questions we never could have imagined we'd have to answer — and maybe we don't.

But there are also those brand new mind-boggling questions of a much more down-to-earth and practical nature that maybe we need to start thinking about. After Dutch researchers unveiled The Next Rembrandt: a computer-generated painting bearing every resemblance to the 17th-century artist, the website The Conversation asked: "Should robot artists be given copyright protection?" At stake, beyond our ability to discern between a man-made and an algorithm-fed work of art, is the status of machines as legal entities and creative forces. This follows a debate over whether a monkey could claim a photograph copyright.

The issue isn't limited to the rise of Michelangelos 2.0: A software engineer from Colorado has recently fed into an artificial intelligence network George R.R. Martin's five-book series, on which the HBO show Game of Thrones is based, in order to have an algorithm write a sixth installment of the series:

Jon rode the dragons in a steep circle, buried fingers in the sand and there a burnt slope. "With a man should leave us clean, wench," he said. "Stop him. Is that much? Until you're at Winterfell simply get inside "em o" wildlings, or on the sound of a bastard dies."

True, the result is clunky — though I've met worse flesh-and-blood writers. And with the exponential progress in AI, deep learning and recurrent neural networks, books by bots (that you would actually buy) are hardly science fiction. Who, then, would be credited for the art created: the engineer who built the machine, the mathematician behind the algorithm, or the computer itself?

Give it a little bit of time, and AI machines will stop being mere copycats and may soon be able to paint masterpieces, compose music hits and write articles like this one — and there won't be any way for you to 00100001 tell.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

Parenthood And The Pressure Of Always Having To Be Doing Better

As a father myself, I'm now better able to understand the pressures my own dad faced. It's helped me face my own internal demands to constantly be more productive and do better.

Photo of a father with a son on his shoulders

Father and son in the streets of Madrid, Spain

Ignacio Pereyra*

-Essay-

When I was a child — I must have been around eight or so — whenever we headed with my mom and grandma to my aunt's country house in Don Torcuato, outside of Buenos Aires, there was the joy of summer plans. Spending the day outdoors, playing soccer in the field, being in the swimming pool and eating delicious food.

But when I focus on the moment, something like a painful thorn appears in the background: from the back window of the car I see my dad standing on the sidewalk waving us goodbye. Sometimes he would stay at home. “I have to work” was the line he used.

Maybe one of my older siblings would also stay behind with him, but I'm sure there were no children left around because we were all enthusiastic about going to my aunt’s. For a long time in his life, for my old man, those summer days must have been the closest he came to being alone, in silence (which he liked so much) and in calm, considering that he was the father of seven. But I can only see this and say it out loud today.

Over the years, the scene repeated itself: the destination changed — it could be a birthday or a family reunion. The thorn was no longer invisible but began to be uncomfortable as, being older, my interpretation of the events changed. When words were absent, I started to guess what might be happening — and we know how random guessing can be.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest