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Detail of 'Dali Atomicus'
Detail of "Dali Atomicus"

There's nothing (and everything) left to chance in the world-famous image Life magazine photographer Philippe Halsman, shot in 1948, of the legendary surrealist painter Salvador Dalí.

Indeed, it took Halsman 28 takes to get Dali Atomicus just right. Little wonder, considering that in addition to a levitating, brush-wielding Dalí, this visual ode to suspension also featured flying cats — three of them — and a mid-air stream of cascading water tossed from a bucket.

Dalí, who died 30 years ago this week,​ was widely photographed, and appears to be partner-in-crime in many of the most memorable images. The iconic Dali Atomicus stands above them all as the pinnacle of photography as absurdist theater.

Dali Atomicus — ©Philippe Halsman / OneShot

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Geopolitics

Our World Is "Flat" No More: Welcome To The Era Of Pure Geopolitics

The dominance of a single narrative of globalization and liberal democracy is over.

Map of the world, focus North America

Luis Rubio

-Analysis-

MEXICO CITY — As the Bolshevik leader Lenin once observed, there are decades when nothing happens and weeks in which decades take place. The big turns in history tend to go unnoticed in their decisive moments because daily life doesn't suddenly change for most people around the world.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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Yet in retrospect, certain moments become crucial. Everything suggests the invasion of Ukraine is one of those turning points, with enormous implications for the world's future.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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