Detail of 'Dali Atomicus'
Detail of "Dali Atomicus"

There's nothing (and everything) left to chance in the world-famous image Life magazine photographer Philippe Halsman, shot in 1948, of the legendary surrealist painter Salvador Dalí.

Indeed, it took Halsman 28 takes to get Dali Atomicus just right. Little wonder, considering that in addition to a levitating, brush-wielding Dalí, this visual ode to suspension also featured flying cats — three of them — and a mid-air stream of cascading water tossed from a bucket.

Dalí, who died 30 years ago this week,​ was widely photographed, and appears to be partner-in-crime in many of the most memorable images. The iconic Dali Atomicus stands above them all as the pinnacle of photography as absurdist theater.

Dali Atomicus — ©Philippe Halsman / OneShot



OneShot is a new digital format to tell the story of a single photograph in an immersive one-minute video.

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Coronavirus

Why U.S. Vaccine Diplomacy In Latin America Makes "Good" Sense

Echoing its cultural diplomacy of the early 20th century, the United States is gifting vaccines to Latin America as part of a renewed "good neighbor'' policy.

Waiting to get the vaccine in Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico

Andrea Matallana

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — Just before and during World War II, the United States' Good Neighbor policy proved a very effective strategy to improve ties with Latin America. Initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the policy's main goal was non-interference and non-intervention. The U.S. would instead focus on reciprocal exchanges with their southern neighbors, including through art and cultural diplomacy.

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