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Watch: OneShot — International Day Against The Use Of Child Soldiers

Detail of photograph by Stevie Mann
Detail of photograph by Stevie Mann

UNICEF marks the International Day against the Use of Child Soldiers on Feb. 12. Also known as Red Hand Day, it calls for urgent action to end the recruitment of children by armed groups. Youth are increasingly vulnerable as conflicts around the world become more brutal, intense and widespread.

UNICEF for International Day Against The Use Of Child Soldiers — Stevie Mann/UNICEF/OneShot

This image comes during a demobilization ceremony near the town of Rumbek, in central South Sudan, as the photographer, Stevie Mann, captured the moment that adolescent boys walk away from the weapons they'd carried. The discarding of their weapons and uniforms symbolizes the end of their military service and the start of their civilian lives.

UNICEF has been instrumental in removing thousands of former child soldiers in Sudan from conflict, providing rehabilitation and family-tracing assistance and supporting long-term care. The mission goes on.



OneShot is a new digital format to tell the story of a single photograph in an immersive one-minute video.

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Society

India Higher Education Inferior Complex: Where Are The Foreign University Campuses?

The proposed UGC guidelines are ill-conceived and populist, and hardly take note of the educational and financial interests of foreign universities.

Image of a group of five people sitting on the grass inside of the Indian Institute of Technology campus.

The IIT - Indian Institute of Technology - Campus

M.M Ansari and Mohammad Naushad Khan

NEW DELHI — Nearly 800,000 young people from India attend foreign universities every year in search of quality education and entrepreneurial training, resulting in a massive outflow of resources – $3 billion – to finance their education. These students look for greener pastures abroad because of the lack of quality teaching and research in most of India’s higher education institutions.

Over 40,000 colleges and 1,000 universities are producing unemployable graduates who cannot function in a knowledge- and technology-intensive economy.

The Indian government's solution is to open doors to foreign universities, with a proposed set of regulations aiming to provide higher education and research services to match global standards, and to control the outflow of resources. But this decision raises many questions.

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