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Detail of photograph by Stevie Mann
Detail of photograph by Stevie Mann

UNICEF marks the International Day against the Use of Child Soldiers on Feb. 12. Also known as Red Hand Day, it calls for urgent action to end the recruitment of children by armed groups. Youth are increasingly vulnerable as conflicts around the world become more brutal, intense and widespread.

UNICEF for International Day Against The Use Of Child Soldiers — Stevie Mann/UNICEF/OneShot

This image comes during a demobilization ceremony near the town of Rumbek, in central South Sudan, as the photographer, Stevie Mann, captured the moment that adolescent boys walk away from the weapons they'd carried. The discarding of their weapons and uniforms symbolizes the end of their military service and the start of their civilian lives.

UNICEF has been instrumental in removing thousands of former child soldiers in Sudan from conflict, providing rehabilitation and family-tracing assistance and supporting long-term care. The mission goes on.



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Injecting Feminism Into Science Is A Good Thing — For Science

Feminists have generated a set of tools to make science less biased and more robust. Why don’t more scientists use it?

As objective as any man

Anto Magzan/ZUMA
Rachel E. Gross

-Essay-

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, a mystery played out across news headlines: Men, it seemed, were dying of infection at twice the rate of women. To explain this alarming disparity, researchers looked to innate biological differences between the sexes — for instance, protective levels of sex hormones, or distinct male-female immune responses. Some even went so far as to test the possibility of treating infected men with estrogen injections.

This focus on biological sex differences turned out to be woefully inadequate, as a group of Harvard-affiliated researchers pointed out earlier this year. By analyzing more than a year of sex-disaggregated COVID-19 data, they showed that the gender gap was more fully explained by social factors like mask-wearing and distancing behaviors (less common among men) and testing rates (higher among pregnant women and health workers, who were largely female).

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