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Peru

Watch: OneShot — Chronic Kidney Disease And A Grieving Mother

Detail of photograph of Santos Felipa
Detail of photograph of Santos Felipa

This last instalment of our three-part OneShot series, tells the story of Santos Felipa, who lost her son last year to Chronic Kidney Disease of undetermined causes (CKDu). Photojournalist and National Geographic storyteller Ed Kashi has traveled to rural Peru to document the effects of CKDu, which risks turning into a global epidemic and may be exacerbated by global warming.

Santos Felipa — ©Ed Kashi/OneShot

On the coast of Talara, Peru, Kashi met Santos Felipa Abad de Arismendis, a 57-year-old woman whose 33-year-old son Frank died from CKDu. Frank had to travel to Piura for his dialysis treatments — three hours away. During one trip, the rain was so heavy that the road was impassable, and Frank was unable to receive dialysis.

Watch Part I, Giving Voice To Kidney Disease Victims In Peru.

Watch Part II, Mary, When A Whole Family Faces Illness.



​OneShot is a new digital format to tell the story of a single photograph in an immersive one-minute video.

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Green Or Gone

Tracking The Asian Fishing "Armada" That Sucks Up Tons Of Seafood Off Argentina's Coast

A brightly-lit flotilla of fishing ships has reappeared in international waters off the southern coast of Argentina as it has annually in recent years for an "industrial harvest" of thousands of tons of fish and shellfish.

Photo of dozens of crab traps

An estimated 500 boats gather annually off the coast of Patagonia

Claudio Andrade

BUENOS AIRES — The 'floating city' of industrial fishing boats has returned, lighting up a long stretch of the South Pacific.

Recently visible off the coast of southern Argentina, aerial photographs showed the well-lit armada of some 500 vessels, parked 201 miles offshore from Comodoro Rivadavia in the province of Chubut. The fleet had arrived for its vast seasonal haul of sea 'products,' confirming its annual return to harvest squid, cod and shellfish on a scale that activists have called an environmental blitzkrieg.

In principle the ships are fishing just outside Argentina's exclusive Economic Zone, though it's widely known that this kind of apparent "industrial harvest" does not respect the territorial line, entering Argentine waters for one reason or another.

For some years now, activists and organizations like Greenpeace have repeatedly denounced industrial-style fishing as exhausting marine resources worldwide and badly affecting regional fauna, even if the fishing outfits technically manage to evade any crackdown by staying in or near international waters.

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