When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Let Them Lead: The Power And Insight Of Refugee Women

It's time to recognize refugee women for what they are: intrepid organizers and providers, argues Liberian peace activist and 2011 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Leymah Gbowee.

Rohingya displaced muslims.
Rohingya displaced muslims.
Leymah Gbowee

-OpEd-

ZAATARI REFUGEE CAMP — The Rohingya exodus is one of the most critical refugee crises of our times, and in recent weeks, as the world marked the first anniversary of the start of the tragic events, images of the exodus abounded. Many of those pictures featured helpless refugee women.

The hardships refugee women endure is indeed heart-wrenching. And yet, portraying them just as passive victims is misleading. Too often, in an effort to raise funds or move the public into action, we paint such women as powerless, helplessly waiting to be rescued from the peril of their fate, when in fact, nothing could be further from the truth. Refugee women are strong and courageous leaders, often the first ones to respond to the needs of their community.

Earlier this year, my fellow Nobel Peace Prize laureates Tawakkol Karman, Shirin Ebadi and Mairead Maguire visited the Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh. Although they witnessed unparalleled levels of devastation, they were struck by the resolve and strength of Rohingya women. The women were supporting relief efforts and offering translation services, as well as organizing and responding to their community's needs to the best of their ability.

The first bed we had was made of grass.

Around the same time I visited the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan with other Nobel laureates, and memories came flooding back of my own experience as a teenager, living in a refugee camp in Ghana. The scenes were immensely familiar: homes insufficiently built to protect families from the sweltering sun; infrastructure focused solely on keeping people alive but not providing any space to truly live and thrive.

My own mother is an example of the same strength and determination that Rohingya women display today. Before fleeing Liberia with my siblings and me, my mother was a dispensing pharmacist. She was not allowed to practice her profession in Ghana, so she resolved to sell vegetables to support the 10 people relying on her. The camp didn't provide mattresses, blankets or any source of income, so the first bed we had was made of grass that my mother cut, dried and wove.

Despite these enormous challenges, she always took time to volunteer in our new community. Her example is a constant reminder to me that the best thing we can do for refugee communities is to provide them — especially women and girls­­ — with opportunities to create the change they need.

I see so much strength, wisdom and resilience in the women in refugee camps. But one year into the Rohingya crisis we rarely hear the voices of Rohingya women included at the decision-making table. It is time for these women to actively determine their future, leading the way for their communities in the process, and for decision-makers to act on their advice.

Tawakkul Karman, Leymah Gbowee and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf display their awards during the presentation of the Nobel Peace Prize on Dec. 10, 2011. — Photo: Harry Wad

When we let ourselves be led by refugee women and girls, we will create real change in the lives of refugees. For too long women and girls have been excluded from systems of representation and participation. Women are interviewed by media and humanitarian organizations, but rarely does their own understanding of the needs and strengths of their communities have a profound impact on how refugee camps are run and organized.

In Zaatari, I met a group of children playing outside. Only one spoke English: a little girl who dreamed of becoming a UN interpreter. As she shared her story, I wanted to tell her of the opportunities that exist for her beyond her camp. I know, firsthand, the anger that bubbles up inside when you are forced to leave your home, but I want girls growing up in refugee camps to know those feelings can be channeled into creating positive change for their community. There is always hope; there is always tomorrow.

We can create tangible change in refugee communities by leaning into the wisdom and insight of refugee women and girls. It is the key to responding to the Rohingya crisis. And it's the best way to ensure that the little girl I met in Zaatari fulfills her dream of being a translator.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Society

Colombia Celebrates Its Beloved Drug For The Ages, Coffee

This essential morning drink for millions worldwide was once considered an addictive menace, earning itself a ban on pain of death in the Islamic world.

Colombia's star product: coffee beans.

Julián López de Mesa Samudio

-Essay-

BOGOTÁ — October 1st is International Coffee Day. Recently it seems as if every day of the calendar year commemorates something — but for Colombia, coffee is indeed special.

For almost a century now we have largely tied our national destiny, culture and image abroad to this drink. Indeed it isn't just Colombia's star product, it became through the course of the 20th century the world's favorite beverage — and the most commonly used drug to boost work output.

Precisely for its stimulating qualities — and for being a mild drug — coffee was not always celebrated, and its history is peppered with the kinds of bans, restrictions and penalties imposed on the 'evil' drugs of today.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ