So serene...
So serene...

Proud of its more than 4,000-year history and heritage, Peru is starting to take exception to certain tourist pranks at venerable sites — most notably, the new fad of posing nude atop Machu Picchu, and sharing the photos online.

The cases of in-the-buff visitors at the 15th Century Inca citadel, a UNESCO World Heritage site, has been happening "with increasing" frequency since 2013, local police have reported. At least 12 tourists have been held since December and had their cameras or smartphones confiscated before they could share their lewdness on the Internet, according to El Espectador, citing EFE and agency reports.

The most recent detentions were of an Australian and Canadian caught flashing last week. An Israeli tourist was quoted as telling the BBC last year that yes, he did run naked through the citadel but "when there was nobody around and knowing this is a sacred site for the Peruvians, and above all, he did it with a lot of respect."

Peru's Deputy-Heritage Minister Luis Jaime Castillo called such antics "crimes against culture." Peruvian sociologist Liuba Koban cautioned that such reactions were excessive, reminding authorities protagonists were often from countries where nudity was nothing deplorable.

Pictures have been posted on the Desnudos en Monumentos account on Facebook, and the antics have been fuelling nudist trends in other neighboring conservative countries.

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China

Peng Shuai, A Reckoning China's Communist Party Can't Afford To Face

The mysterious disappearance – and brief reappearance – of the Chinese tennis star after her #metoo accusation against a party leader shows Beijing is prepared to do whatever is necessary to quash any challenge from its absolute rule.

Fears are growing about the safety and whereabouts of Peng Shuai

Yan Bennett and John Garrick

Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai's apparent disappearance may have ended with a smattering of public events, which were carefully curated by state-run media and circulated in online clips. But many questions remain about the three weeks in which she was missing, and concerns linger over her well-being.

Peng, a former Wimbledon and French Open doubles champion, had been out of the public eye since Nov. 2. 2021 when she penned a since-deleted social media post accusing former Chinese Vice-Premier Zhang Gaoli of sexual misconduct.

In the U.S. and Europe, such moments of courage from high-profile women have built momentum to out perpetrators of sexual harassment and assault and give a voice to those wronged. But in the political context of today's People's Republic of China (PRC) – a country that tightly controls political narratives within and outside its borders – something else happened. Peng was seemingly silenced; her #MeToo allegation was censored almost as soon as it was made.

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