food / travel

Ring In New Year With The Latest In Culinary Luxury: Swiss Caviar

For the first time, the high-end fish eggs are being bred in Switzerland, where the well-to-do have long enjoyed imported caviar. But it was an odd twist that allowed for the sturgeon to flourish: lukewarm water coming out of a draining gallery in railway

The Tropical House in Switzerland will produce 300kg of caviar by February 2012 (swissinfo.ch)
The Tropical House in Switzerland will produce 300kg of caviar by February 2012 (swissinfo.ch)
Silviane Blum

FRUTIGEN – Despite the crisis, some lucky few might be celebrating New Year's with a little caviar to go along with their Champagne. And for the first time, an even smaller subset of those lucky few will be able to taste caviar harvested in Switzerland. Some 300 kilograms has been produced in the heart of the Swiss Alps, and should be available in select stores until February.

The World Sturgeon Conservation Society (WSCS) has been encouraging the development of sturgeon farms to prevent the species from going extinct. The Swiss "Tropical House" took on the task in 2005, bringing in Siberian sturgeon. There are 35,000 today, and this winter the first females are producing eggs. The company is hoping to be profitable in three to five years, with an annual output of about three tons of caviar and 18 tons of sturgeon filets thanks to a 60,000 fish contingent.

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Society

Face In The Mirror: Dutch Hairdressers Trained To Recognize Domestic Violence

Early detection and accessible help are essential in the fight against domestic violence. Hairdressers in the Dutch province of North Brabant are now being trained to identify when their customers are facing abuse at home.

Hair Salon Rob Peetoom in Rotterdam

Daphne van Paassen

TILBURG — The three hairdressers in the bare training room of the hairdressing company John Beerens Hair Studio are absolutely sure: they have never seen signs of domestic violence among their customers in this city in the Netherlands. "Or is that naïve?"

When, a moment later, statistics appear on the screen — one in 20 adults deals with domestic violence, as well as one or two children per class — they realize: this happens so often, they must have victims in their chairs.

All three have been in the business for years and have a loyal clientele. Sometimes they have customers crying in the chair because of a divorce. According to Irma Geraerts, 45, who has her own salon in Reusel, a village in the North Brabant region, they're part-time psychologists. "A therapist whose hair I cut explained to me that we have an advantage because we touch people. We are literally close. The fact that we stand behind people and make eye contact via the mirror also helps."

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