OUEST FRANCE, DIRECT MATIN (France)

Worldcrunch

PARIS - Some might say that McDonald’s in France is getting just a wee bit too, well, French.

A year after introducing various “McBaguette” offerings using the famous French bread, the American fast food chain has just introduced its version of France’s national sandwich: jambon-fromage. If that sounds chic, let us translate: ham-and-cheese.

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If you order one at McDo (as the fast food chain is called in France) together with a beverage, you’ll pay 4.50 euros. But as Ouest France daily reports, for the first time, the menu offering comes without frites. Let us translate again: fries. That is: French fries…Hmmm?

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As fans of Pulp Fiction recall, a French Quarter-Pounder is called "Royal Cheese" (maveric)

Elsewhere around the world, McDonald's has been busy capturing local flavors, including the Churrasco sandwich in Chile and Japan’s Teriyaki burger, and McArabia pita bread delights.

But France, which may surprise you as the world’s No. 2 consumer of McDonald’s, is always looking to keep local tastes satisfied, having launched the McCantal, with the renowned cheese from south-central France, and the Charolais made with famous French Charolais ground beef.

The McBaguette "long-form" hamburger has been a major success, with some 10 million sold last year. Still, that trails the 120 million Big Macs ordered. And if you were in France, how would you ask for one? Un Big Mac, s'il vous plait...

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Coronavirus

Texas In Germany? Saxony Mixes Anti-Vaxxers And Far-Right Politics

When it comes to vaccination rates, there are striking parallels between Germany and the United States. The states with the most opposition to vaccines differ politically from those with the highest vaccination rates. Now the consequences for booster shots are starting to become visible, especially in the United States.

A protest in Saxony last year against COVID-19 restrictions

Zentralbild/dpa via ZUMA
Daniel Friedrich Sturm

-Analysis-

WASHINGTON — Ok, so Saxony was singled out last week in a New York Times article as an example of the disastrous vaccination situation in parts of Europe. The article talks about the link between anti-vaxxers and the political success of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party in the eastern German state.

In a sense, Saxony is Germany's Texas. For instance, 59% of U.S. citizens are fully vaccinated, but in strictly Republican Texas, where Donald Trump overwhelmingly won the 2020 election, this figure stands at 54%.

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