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food / travel

Lactose-Intolerant Italian Coffee Lovers Rejoice: Here Comes The Capriccino!

The finer things in life sometimes just need a twist to be shared by everyone. The authentic coffee-and-steamed-milk recipe for cappuccino will now be available in Italian caffès for those who are lactose intolerant. The capriccino recipe replaces cow&

Cappuccino for you! (allanwoo)
Cappuccino for you! (allanwoo)

*NEWSBITES

TURIN - Espresso or double-shot, latte or macchiato, cappuccino or capriccino? When ordering a simple coffee in the country where they make it best, you already face a surprisingly vast array of choices. Now, there is another, unusual option: it's called a capriccino, a new warm coffee beverage made with steamed goat's milk ("capra" is goat in Italian) aimed at the needs – and desires -- of an increasing lactose-intolerant population.

There is also the cioccaprino, an Italian version of hot chocolate, also made with goat's milk.

According to the main Italian farmers' association, more than 100,000 children, and a somewhat smaller number of adults, in the country are lactose intolerant. Still, only 0.5% of cafes and restaurants serve milk that these customers can drink.

This winter, capriccino and cioccaprino have begun to be sold in resorts along Italian ski slopes. Now, the plan is to spread them into cafes across the country. At Fattoria Biò, a resort in the ski area of Camigliatello Silano, in the southern Calabria region, hundreds of people have tried -- and, reportedly, enjoyed -- the new beverages.

Goat's milk is slightly more expensive than cow's milk, so a capriccino costs 2 euros, while a classic cappuccino costs around 1.20 euros in most Italian cafes.

Read more from La Stampa in Italian

Photo - allanwoo

*Newsbites are digest items, not direct translations

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Society

Lionel To Lorenzo: Infecting My Son With The Beautiful Suffering Of Soccer Passion

This is the Argentine author's fourth world cup abroad, but his first as the father of two young boys.

photo of Lionel Messi saluting the crowd

Argentina's Lionel Messi celebrates the team's win against Australia at the World Cup in Qatar

Ignacio Pereyra

I love soccer. But that’s not the only reason why the World Cup fascinates me. There are so many stories that can be told through this spectacular, emotional, exaggerated sport event, which — like life and parenthood — is intense and full of contradictions.

This is the fourth World Cup that I’m watching away from my home country, Argentina. Every experience has been different but, at times, Qatar 2022 feels a lot like Japan-South Korea 2002, the first one I experienced from abroad, when I was 20 years old and living in Spain.

Now, two decades later, living in Greece as the father of two children, some of those memories are reemerging vividly.

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