JERUSALEM POST, THE TIMES OF ISRAEL (Israel)

Worldcrunch

JERUSALEM- With Israel’s largest storm in 20 years bringing snow and freezing temperatures to Jerusalem and the mountains in the north and center of Israel on Wednesday night, authorities closed part of the main highway connecting Tel Aviv and the capital for a short time due to ice that had accumulated in a mountain pass reports The Times of Israel.

Residents of the capital woke up to more than 10 centimeters of snow in some places, leaving its mark throughout the center of the city, though higher elevation neighborhoods notched the largest accumulation.

Most schools were closed, and The Jerusalem Post reported nearly 500 calls made to the Fire and Rescue Services for assistance in the capital.

In a place usually known for its bright sunshine, historic treasures and religious zeal, Jerusalemites and its visitors took advantage of this rare change of weather. Here's some of our favorites shots of the holy city under a blanket of white:

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Society

Germany's Legendary Clubbing Culture Crashes Museum Space

The exhibition “Electro” in Düsseldorf is an unlikely tribute to a joyful and uninhibited club culture, with curators forced to contend with limits of a museum setting ... and another COVID lockdown.

A woman with a "Techno" tattoo in front of the famous Berghain

Boris Pofalla

DÜSSELDORF — The last party at the Berghain nightclub in Berlin lasted from Saturday evening until Monday morning. On the first weekend of December, some clubbers lined up for nine hours outside the former power plant – and still didn’t make it past the doormen. A friend said that dancing in the most famous techno club in the world on its last evening was like landing a spot in the last lifeboat to leave the sinking Titanic on 14 April 1912.

It is surely a coincidence that the first comprehensive exhibition charting the 100-year history of electronic music in Germany opened in the same week that nightclubs across the country were forced to close. It wasn’t planned that way, but it’s like opening an exhibition about the cultural history of alcohol the day after the introduction of prohibition.

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