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ADNKRONOS, LA STAMPA (Italy), BIOSCIENCE TECHNOLOGY (USA)

Worldcrunch

MILAN - Great news for coffee junkies worldwide from the place where it's brewed to perfection: Italian researchers say even three or four cups of espresso a day is actually good for you.

A study at Mario Negri Pharmacological Institute in Milan showed the daily cup or three of Joe was more than just safe to drink – in healthy people, it can have beneficial effects too, reports La Stampa.

@bwisephotos

The components of coffee (among them, the famous antioxidants) have positive effects, including preventing heart problems, mouth and throat cancers, liver tumors and cirrhosis, as well as endometrial and colorectal cancers. Recent data shows that coffee could even reduce mortality rates, though this has yet to be confirmed.

“It’s important not to confuse caffeine with coffee,” explains Alessandra Tavani, who headed the Milan study. The effects of caffeine vary from person to person, and those with a low tolerance for it should stick to decaffeinated coffees, according to the Adnkronos news agency.

@white_chocolate78

The caffeine in a cup of coffee can help prevent fatigue, increase alertness and boost intestinal activity. Caffeine can also have the same painkilling effects that aspirin has, with an increased rate of absorption into the bloodstream.

In coffee-loving Italy, these three to four cups a day are enough to double the intake of antioxidants, thanks to the Italians' Mediterranean diet, which is full of fruit and vegetables.

This isn’t the first time that coffee has been hailed as healthy fare, as the American Chemical Society looked into a potential link between un-roasted coffee beans and the prevention of type-2 diabetes. It seems that the cholorogenic acids, which are found naturally in coffee beans, can help control blood sugar levels – a key requirement for diabetes sufferers – and also control weight too, reports Bioscience Technology.

@joyablecoffee

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How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

American and Southwest Airlines have been refusing to allow Cubans on board flights if they've been blacklisted by the government in Havana.

How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

Boarding a plane in Camaguey, Cuba

Santiago Villa

On Sunday, American Airlines refused to let Cuban writer Carlos Manuel Álvarez board a Miami flight bound for Havana. It was at least the third time this year that a U.S. airline refused to let Cubans on board to return to their homeland after Havana circulated a government "blacklist" of critics of the regime. Clearly undemocratic and possibly illegal under U.S. law, the airlines want to make sure to cash in on a lucrative travel route, writes Colombian journalist Santiago Villa:

-OpEd-

Imagine for a moment that you left your home country years ago because you couldn't properly pursue your chosen career there. It wasn't easy, of course: Your profession is not just singularly demanding, but even at the top of the game you might not be assured a stable or sufficient income, and you've had to take on second jobs, working in bars and restaurants.

This chosen vocation is that of a writer or journalist, or perhaps an artist, which has kept you tied to your homeland, often the subject of your work, even if you don't live there anymore.

Since leaving, you've been back home several times, though not so much for work. Because if you did, you would be followed in cars and receive phone calls to let you know you are being watched.

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