When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!
Pudong airport
Pudong airport

SHANGHAI — Some inhabitants near Shanghai’s Pudong International Airport are reporting something far more odious than the usual noise pollution.

According to Zhou, who lives just south of Shanghai in Luchaogang, even on sunny days, he can see "golden raindrops" falling down, accompanied by a bad smell, the Dongfang Daily reported.

The droppings, which Dongfang Daily referred to as "fecal rain," accumulate on locals’ cars and their night-time duvets put outdoors to air out. Since Luchaogang is located under the Shanghai airport flight path, local inhabitants blame arriving aircraft, which in the morning land every five to 10 minutes.

A Pudong airport staff member told the Dongfang Daily that modern aircraft now all have a vacuum system for collecting all human waste into a sealed fecal tank. Even if the system breaks down, the exrement should stay in the tail of the plane and not to be discharged in the air.

However, a maintenance crewman at China Eastern Airlines, while insisting that the vast majority of Chinese civil aircraft today have adopted the new vacuum collecting system, admitted that "old planes still have stool collection containers that are not tight enough and the situation where the feces leak out can indeed occur," the Xinhua news agency reported.

After the initial press reports, Pudong airport has promised to investigate whether some aircraft toilet collecting systems have cracked or leaked.

Meanwhile, some may never be able to hear Prince's classic song the same way again...


You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Green

Fading Flavor: Production Of Saffron Declines Sharply

Saffron is well-known for its flavor and its expense. But in Kashmir, one of the flew places it grows, cultivation has fallen dramatically thanks for climate change, industry, and farming methods.

Photo of women harvesting saffron in Kashmir

Harvesting of Saffron in Kashmir

Mubashir Naik

In northern India along the bustling Jammu-Srinagar national highway near Pampore — known as the saffron town of Kashmir —people are busy picking up saffron flowers to fill their wicker baskets.

During the autumn season, this is a common sight in the Valley as saffron harvesting is celebrated like a festival in Kashmir. The crop is harvested once a year from October 21 to mid-November.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest

InterNations