Pudong airport
Pudong airport

SHANGHAI — Some inhabitants near Shanghai’s Pudong International Airport are reporting something far more odious than the usual noise pollution.

According to Zhou, who lives just south of Shanghai in Luchaogang, even on sunny days, he can see "golden raindrops" falling down, accompanied by a bad smell, the Dongfang Daily reported.

The droppings, which Dongfang Daily referred to as "fecal rain," accumulate on locals’ cars and their night-time duvets put outdoors to air out. Since Luchaogang is located under the Shanghai airport flight path, local inhabitants blame arriving aircraft, which in the morning land every five to 10 minutes.

A Pudong airport staff member told the Dongfang Daily that modern aircraft now all have a vacuum system for collecting all human waste into a sealed fecal tank. Even if the system breaks down, the exrement should stay in the tail of the plane and not to be discharged in the air.

However, a maintenance crewman at China Eastern Airlines, while insisting that the vast majority of Chinese civil aircraft today have adopted the new vacuum collecting system, admitted that "old planes still have stool collection containers that are not tight enough and the situation where the feces leak out can indeed occur," the Xinhua news agency reported.

After the initial press reports, Pudong airport has promised to investigate whether some aircraft toilet collecting systems have cracked or leaked.

Meanwhile, some may never be able to hear Prince's classic song the same way again...


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Geopolitics

In Sudan, A Surprise About-Face Marks Death Of The Revolution

Ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok was the face of the "stolen revolution". The fact that he accepted, out of the blue, to return at the same position, albeit on different footing, opens the door to the final legitimization of the coup.

Sudanese protesters demonstrating against the military regime in London on Nov. 20, 2021

Nesrine Malik

A little over a month ago, a military coup in Sudan ended a military-civilian partnership established after the 2019 revolution that removed President Omar al-Bashir after almost 30 years in power. The army arrested the Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and, along with several of his cabinet and other civil government officials, threw him in detention. In the weeks that followed, the Sudanese military and their partners in power, the Rapid Support Forces, moved quickly.

They reappointed a new government of “technocrats” (read “loyalists”), shut down internet services, and violently suppressed peaceful protests against the coup and its sabotaging of the 2019 revolution. During those weeks, Hamdok remained the symbol of the stolen revolution, betrayed by the military, detained illegally, unable to communicate with the people who demanded his return. In his figure, the moral authority of the counter-coup resided.

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