Obama’s Shadow, White House Photographer Pete Souza Looks Back
Caroline Stevan

Pete Souza has worked for the Chicago Tribune, Life and National Geographic. He's covered the war in Afghanistan after the 9/11 attacks and the beginning of Barack Obama's Senate career. He's been the White House's official photographer twice, for Ronald Reagan and for Barack Obama. At 62, Souza is always ready for another shot. But first, it is time to zoom in and reflect on a singular presidency.

LE TEMPS: How do you feel at the end of the Obama presidency?

PETE SOUZA: The end of this administration leaves me with a bittersweet feeling. I've really appreciated being able to document Barack Obama's presidency in pictures through both terms. But I'm also looking forward to a new rhythm.

What sort of a photographic model is Barack Obama?

He's not a "model." He's the president of the United States and he happens to be a good photographic subject because he's allowed me to capture the sincere and spontaneous moments of his life.

Many observers also believe you've contributed immensely to his "cool" image. What do you think?

I have no idea. My work consists of taking the best photographs I can, day after day.

I've read that you'd taken between 500 and 1,000 pictures per day. If you could only keep one, which one would it be?

That is correct, except for the busier days when I take more than 2,000 pictures. I consider this work to be important in its entirety, and not just one single photograph.

You were also Ronald Reagan's official photographer. What's the main difference between these two experiences?

There are so many differences. President Reagan was more than 50 years older than me. I didn't know him before entering the White House and that limited my access. He also wasn't as physically active as President Obama. I've known Barack Obama since 2005, so I'd already developed a professional relationship with him. This led him to grant me unrestricted access to his presidency.

Souza in action in Oslo in 2009 after Obama won the Nobel Prize — Photo: Jan-Kristian Schriwer

Political communication has changed a lot these past few years and images are an essential part of it. What do you think of this evolution and the rise of social networks?

The emergence of social media is also a big difference between the two administrations. Twitter and Instagram in particular have become huge tools for the White House. I became the photographer of a freshly-elected President Obama at a time when social media was booming. Anybody would have made the most of these tools, no matter who was going to be the photographer or president.

What are your projects for the future?

I will continue to be very active in the field of photography. I don't know exactly what I'm going to do, but I'd like to to publish a book on my work during the Obama administration.



Here is a look back at the two Obama terms, year-by-year, through Pete Souza's lens. All pictures: Pete Souza/The White House

2009

Running with the family's dog, Bo, in the White House in Washington, D.C. on April 13, 2009

2010

With Indiab Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in New Delhi, India, on Nov. 8, 2010

2011

In the Situation Room of the White House, with Vice President Joe Biden and members of the national security team, as the mission against Osama bin Laden goes underway on May 1, 2011

2012

On "Kiss Cam" with First Lady Michelle Obama at a basketball game in Washington, D.C. on July 16, 2012

2013

Playing with kids during a visit to a pre-kindergarten classroom in Decatur, Georgia on Feb. 14, 2013.

2014

Watching July 4 fireworks from the roof of the White House with First Lady Michelle Obama and daughter Malia Obama

2015

Boarding Air Force One at Norman Manley International Airportin Kingston, Jamaica, on April 9, 2015

2016

In the Green Room of the White House on Jan. 5, 2016

2017

In the Oval Office on Jan. 10, 2017

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Support Worldcrunch
We are grateful for reader support to continue our unique mission of delivering in English the best international journalism, regardless of language or geography. Click here to contribute whatever you can. Merci!
Geopolitics

Taliban And Iran: The Impossible Alliance May Already Be Crumbling

After the Sunni fundamentalist Taliban rulers retook control of Afghanistan, there were initial, friendly signals exchanged with Iran's Shia regime. But a recent border skirmish recalls tensions from the 1990s, when Iran massed troops on the Afghan frontier.

Taliban troops during a military operation in Kandahar

The clashes reported this week from the border between Iran and Afghanistan were perhaps inevitable.

There are so far scant details on what triggered the flare up on Wednesday between Iranian border forces and Taliban fighters, near the district of Hirmand in Iran's Sistan-Baluchestan province. Still, footage posted on social media indicated the exchange of fire was fairly intense, with troops on both sides using both light and heavy weaponry.

Keep reading... Show less
Support Worldcrunch
We are grateful for reader support to continue our unique mission of delivering in English the best international journalism, regardless of language or geography. Click here to contribute whatever you can. Merci!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ