When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

NEW YORK TIMES, CNN, CBS (U.S.)

Worldcrunch

After his dismal performance in the first debate, President Barack Obama rebounded Wednesday night with a feisty performance in his "town-hall" style face-to-face against Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

Democrats appeared widely pleased with an Obama who appeared much more focused and forthright against Romney compared to his overly polite and reserved demeanour on October 3.

Immediate polls suggest voters gave the incumbent the upperhand with the CNN poll tipped to Obama with 46% to Romney's 39%. Of respondents to a CBS poll, 37% said Obama was stronger compared to 30% for Romney.

In a tense debate, Obama challenged Romney on his shifting positions on tax policies, prompting Romney to retaliate by repeatedly attacking Obama's economic record over the past four years.

When sparring over Romney's investments in China, Romney challenged the President to look at investments in his own pensions. The President quipped: "I don't look at my pension. It's not as big as yours."

At one point, the two presidential candidates squared off, face to face, arguing and talking over each other

We're about three seconds away from the knife fight from "Beat It." #debates

— Chase Mitchell (@ChaseMit) October 17, 2012

I feel like Obama's staff stabbed him in the chest w/ the adrenaline needle from Pulp Fiction. THAT DUDE IS AWAKE! #twib2012#debates

— Elon James White (@elonjames) October 17, 2012

Speaking about Obama's much needed burst of energy, Peter Baker in the New York Times, wrote: "Thirteen days after he took presidential decorum to a Xanax extreme, he tucked away a dinner of steak and potatoes and then went out on stage with plenty of red meat for anxious supporters."

"Most improved -- that award goes to Barack Obama," CNN Senior Political Analyst David Gergen said. "I think he had a much stronger debate tonight."

After Big Bird in the first debate and Joe Biden's smirk one week ago, this time the Internet meme was Romney's use of the expression "binders full of women."

When speaking about searching for qualified women to fill cabinet posts, Romney recounted: “I went to a number of women’s groups and said, ‘Can you help us find folks,’ and they brought us whole binders full of women.”

Hey girl, I just put you in my binder.

— Paul Ryan Gosling (@PaulRyanGosling) October 17, 2012

The two candidates will meet for one more debate on October 22 in Boca Raton, Florida, ahead of the Nov. 6 vote.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Along The "New Border" Of Ukraine, Annexation Has Just Doubled The Danger

Vladimir Putin announced the annexation of Ukrainian territories in a ceremony in the Kremlin. In a village just a few kilometers away from what is now the Ukraine-Russia "border" in Putin's eyes, life continues amid constant shelling and the fear of what comes next.

Ukrainian soldiers are stationed in the village of Inhulka, near Kherson.

Stefan Schocher

INHULKA — The trail leads over a gravel road, a rickety pontoon bridge past a checkpoint. Here in the remote village of Inhulka near Kherson in southern Ukraine, soldiers sit in front of the village shop. Inside, two women run back and forth behind the counter, making coffee, selling sausages, weighing tomatoes. "Natalochka, where are the cookies," calls a dark-haired lady across the room.

But Natalochka, her colleague, is about to lose her nerve. "What kind of life is that?" she says, finally reaching up to grab the cookies from the top of a shelf. What kind of life can it be, she asks, when something is constantly exploding next to you and you don't know if you'll wake up in the morning.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

Inhulka is the center of a rural community. 1,587 inhabitants, as the village chief says, one school, one kindergarten, one doctor, two stores. Since March, nothing here is as it used to be. That was when the Russian army came to the village.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ