When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

LES ECHOS

Why The Survival Of The Great Hamster of Alsace Is About More Than Naughty Little Rodents

The European Court of Justice has ordered France to take measures to save the endangered species, which has become a symbol for fighting urbanization and single-crop industrial farming.

The wild cousins of this French hamster are hanging on for survival
The wild cousins of this French hamster are hanging on for survival
Catherine Vincent

It is so discreet that hardly anyone is aware of its existence -- and even fewer actually care. We might say that the Great Hamster of Alsace could have disappeared without so much as a rustling of the trees. And here it is, arousing the ire of the European Court of Justice!

In a judgment issued on June, 9, the European court states that France has not taken sufficient measures to protect the rodent, and must set this situation straight "as soon as possible." This final judgment has just been justified once again by the count of hamster holes in 2011 in the eastern French departments of Bas-Rhin and Haut-Rhin, as published on July 8, by the National Environment, City Planning and Housing Organization. In 22 villages, 460 holes were found. In 2010, 480 holes were present in 25 different villages.

But why should we care about the Great Hamster? Isn't it an animal that people in Alsace (the only French region where it has ever been able to thrive) have long considered a terrible pest? Why has this animal, fond of wheat and barley and whose maximum length is 25 cm, been protected on a European scale since 1992, and in France since 1993? Because this Cricetus cricetus, which used to be ruthlessly hunted, has become the symbol of the fight against urbanization and single-crop corn farming that covers now more than 80% of the Alsatian plane.

To save the species, Jean-Paul Burget founded the association Save The Wildlife (SFS), which lodged the complaint with the European Court. "The hamster is the emblem of the small field fauna," he says. "All the wildlife will disappear with it."

SFS runs three hamster farms, and with the support of the Hunting and Wildlife National Office (ONCFS), works to reintroduce the farmed Great Hamsters into the wild as part of a national plan to maintain the population of the species.

Paying damages

Still, this and other efforts appear to be insufficient to guarantee the survival of the species. The number of holes present in the region in 2011 is far lower than the minimal number – around 1,500 holes -- that would enable the species to survive.

In response to the European Court of Justice, France's Ecology Minister on June 21 launched a call for proposals to set up compensation for damages done to biodiversity. Alsace's protection of its Great Hamster is among its four objectives.

Benoît Hartmann, spokesman for the French Nature Environment association, worries that the basic problem remains finding the right territories suitable for reintroducing the hamsters. "In theory, these compensations are good news," he says. "But in practice, how are we going to find areas to put this project in place?"

Burget says in the areas where they have been introduced, straw crops have been planted, and surrounded by electric fences to prevent foxes from eating the hamsters. "If we want to save the hamster, we only need a good network of straw crops," he concludes.

Read the original story in French

Photo - Tambako The Jaguar

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

In Northern Kenya, Where Climate Change Is Measured In Starving Children

The worst drought in 40 years, which has deepened from the effects of climate change, is hitting the young the hardest around the Horn of Africa. A close-up look at the victims, and attempts to save lives and limit lasting effects on an already fragile region in Kenya.

Photo of five mothers holding their malnourished children

At feeding time, nurses and aides encourage mothers to socialize their children and stimulate them to eat.

Georgina Gustin

KAKUMA — The words "Stabilization Ward" are painted in uneven black letters above the entrance, but everyone in this massive refugee camp in Kakuma, Kenya, calls it ya maziwa: The place of milk.

Rescue workers and doctors, mothers and fathers, have carried hundreds of starving children through the doors of this one-room hospital wing, which is sometimes so crowded that babies and toddlers have to share beds. A pediatric unit is only a few steps away, but malnourished children don’t go there. They need special care, and even that doesn’t always save them.

In an office of the International Rescue Committee nearby, Vincent Opinya sits behind a desk with figures on dry-erase boards and a map of the camp on the walls around him. “We’ve lost 45 children this year due to malnutrition,” he says, juggling emergencies, phone calls, and texts. “We’re seeing a significant increase in malnutrition cases as a result of the drought — the worst we’ve faced in 40 years.”

From January to June, the ward experienced an 800 percent rise in admissions of children under 5 who needed treatment for malnourishment — a surge that aid groups blame mostly on a climate change-fueled drought that has turned the region into a parched barren.

Opinya, the nutrition manager for the IRC here, has had to rattle off these statistics many times, but the reality of the numbers is starting to crack his professional armor. “It’s a very sad situation,” he says, wearily. And he believes it will only get worse. A third year of drought is likely on the way.

More children may die. But millions will survive malnutrition and hunger only to live through a compromised future, researchers say. The longer-term health effects of this drought — weakened immune systems, developmental problems — will persist for a generation or more, with consequences that will cascade into communities and societies for decades.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest