When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

LA STAMPA

Vacationing Italian Man Jailed In Sweden For Slapping His Son For Public Tantrum

In a parenting culture clash, the southern Italian visitor is being prosecuted in Stockholm under a super strict law against any form of “offensive treatment” of one’s own children -- not only slapping, but maybe even yelling at them.

Swedish policeman
Swedish policeman

Worldcrunch NEWSBITES

STOCKHOLM – Europe may share a single currency, and other signs of increasing integration and common culture. But apparently there is still a major North-South divide when it comes to a key question: parenting. A local politician from southern Italy was arrested during his vacation in Sweden for having slapped his son in public. He risks a conviction for assault on a minor, according to the strict Swedish law which since 1966 has forbidden any kind of physical punishment of children.

Giovanni Colasante, town counselor of the small village of Canosa in Puglia, was on vacation in Stockholm with his family and friends. On August 23, the group was going to a restaurant, but Colasante's 12-year-old son threw a tantrum and refused to enter with the rest of the group. According to the charges, Colasante slapped him in the face.

Colasante denies the charges. "The child refused to enter in the restaurant. His father scolded him vehemently, and gesticulated. But this is how we do things in Italy," said his defense attorney Giovanni Patruno.
 "Colasante didn't hit his son."

What is known is that Colasante's heated reaction convinced some witnesses that the man was assaulting his son. They alerted the police who arrested Colasante. The Italian man spent three days and two nights in a Stockholm jail, and cannot leave the city before the trial which will take place on Sep. 6.

The attorney Patruno says that surely his client will be released, given that his action was only a "vehement scolding." In Italy, where people are often loud, the scene would have been considered normal. But in Sweden even yelling too much could be punished as a crime. According to the Swedish law «förbud mot barnaga» against children physical abuse, even «kränkande behandling» (offensive treatment) is forbidden. Yes, it appears that what elsewhere is a "good scolding" can be punished with jail time.

Read the full story by Francesco Saverio Alonzo

Photo - Håkan Dahlström

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Future

Injecting Feminism Into Science Is A Good Thing — For Science

Feminists have generated a set of tools to make science less biased and more robust. Why don’t more scientists use it?

As objective as any man

Anto Magzan/ZUMA
Rachel E. Gross

-Essay-

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, a mystery played out across news headlines: Men, it seemed, were dying of infection at twice the rate of women. To explain this alarming disparity, researchers looked to innate biological differences between the sexes — for instance, protective levels of sex hormones, or distinct male-female immune responses. Some even went so far as to test the possibility of treating infected men with estrogen injections.

This focus on biological sex differences turned out to be woefully inadequate, as a group of Harvard-affiliated researchers pointed out earlier this year. By analyzing more than a year of sex-disaggregated COVID-19 data, they showed that the gender gap was more fully explained by social factors like mask-wearing and distancing behaviors (less common among men) and testing rates (higher among pregnant women and health workers, who were largely female).

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ