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Switzerland

Switzerland's Sixteen-Year-Old Prostitute Problem

Op-Ed: Switzerland is the only European country where girls are allowed to work as prostitutes beginning at age 16. That’s a reasonable age of sexual consent. But for sex workers, Switzerland lives in sin until it raises the minimum age for prostitution t

Prostitution is legal in the Netherlands, but only after the age of 18 (facemepls)
Prostitution is legal in the Netherlands, but only after the age of 18 (facemepls)
Chantal Galladé*

ZURICH -- About a year ago, I drove with a Zurich police patrol through the red light district to try and get a better picture of the scene. I'm still haunted by the memories of the very young girls. They could hardly speak a word of German and they were selling their bodies. Their pimps stood not far away, waiting to take the money they earned.

Switzerland is the only European country where 16-year-olds are allowed to prostitute themselves. This is repugnant and incomprehensible. It makes Switzerland a destination for sex tourists with a penchant for children. Some Swiss "escort agencies' highlight the fact that they offer underage girls.

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Coronavirus

In Shanghai, A Brewing Expat Exodus As COVID Crackdown Shows "Real" China

Not only strict rules of freedom of movement as part of Zero-COVID policy but also an increase in censorship has raised many questions for the expat population in the megacity of 26 million that had long enjoyed a kind of special status in China as a place of freedom and openness. A recent survey of foreigners in the Chinese megacity found that 48% of respondents said they would leave Shanghai within the next year.

People walk in Tianzifang, located in Huangpu District, a well-known tourist attraction in Shanghai.

Lili Bai

SHANGHAI — On the seventh day of the lockdown, Félix, a French expat who has worked in Shanghai for four years, texted his boss: I want to "run,' mais je sais pas quand (but I don’t know when). A minute later, he received a reply: moi aussi (me too).

Félix had recently learned the new Mandarin word 润 (run) from social network postings of his local friends. Because its pinyin “rùn” is the same as the English word “run,” Chinese youth had begun to use it to express their wish to escape reality, either to “be freed from mundane life”, or to “run toward your future.”

For foreigners like Félix, by associating the expression “run” with the feeling of the current lockdown in Shanghai, “everything makes sense.” Félix recalled how at the end of March, the government denied rumors of an impending lockdown: “My Chinese colleagues all said, Shanghai is China’s top city, there would be no lockdown no matter what.”

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